FAQs

Q?

SIBA Christmas Party at Moores Hill Senior Center

A.

Happy Holidays everyone! The SIBA Christmas party will be held at the Moores Hill Senior Center on Friday, December 16th, (the day after the meeting) 6:30pm.

The Christmas Party evolved from a meeting way back when in December when we were covering mead making (making wine from honey) as an off-season topic. Other mead and winemakers in the club brought some of their samples. Of course food was in order... so it grew into a jovial gathering of friends who each had unique talents and creations to share.

Bring a dish (a main dish, appetizer, or dessert) to share of your choice. If you are a wine or mead-maker, bring along one of your latest to share. We'll have some small dixie cups to sample with. In the past, we have seen, cheese, cured meats, pickled and fermented foods to try. We've also seen some pretty creative desserts come from our membership at past Christmas parties. See the honeycomb cake pictures above.

The primary goal of the Christmas party is to celebrate and reflect on the season, both successes and failures... and talk about them with great company and some good food and drink. While this is a family-friendly event and you're encouraged to bring your spouse or significant other, (especially if we've never met them,) just know that alcohol will be present and served in a responsible manner.

Hope to see you and we wish everyone happy, safe and healthy holidays with lots of friends and family!

Q?

Indiana Bee School XXII

A.

2023 Bee School will be held on February 25th, 2023 at Horizon Convention Center in Muncie, Indiana. We have two Plenary speakers and several of Indiana's own speakers.  For more information about our guest speakers, see the right hand side of this page "Who are our Guest Speakers?".

Along with our Plenary Speakers, sessions and discussions will be held for beekeepers with any level of skill, experience or ability. Some of the confirmed speakers and topics are:

  1. Planning on ordering a package this year?  Steve Doty will be teaching a class with important information about installing packages.
  2. Wonder why the drones are important in a hive?  You can listen to Garett Slater explain all about drones.
  3. Lifetime member, Michael Chanley will be presenting on "How to Grow Your Business Using Social Media"
  4. Yes, we have another generation of Shenefields making his debut as a speaker on "Maximize Your Honey Production"

Topics on introductory beekeeping tools and techniques, as well as learning opportunities for the more advanced beekeeper will be available.  Along with a great program, we'll have our raffle, live auction and silent auction again.  We also have a newly designed shirt along with our standard designs.  Many vendors will be on-hand with a variety of  displays and supplies, see the list below that will be updated as vendors register.

The cost to attend is the same as it's been for several years now.  Our goal is to make it affordable for our beekeepers to attend.

  • $50 for members
  • $60 for non-members

Registration is now open.  Click here, if you wish to download and mail in the registration.  Click here, if you wish to use the online system.  There is a transaction fee for using the online system.

Q?

Beekeepers of Indiana Fall Conference/Workshop

A.

Fall Conference and Workshops for The Beekeepers of Indiana will be held on Friday/Saturday October 28/29th. The location is Terre Haute Convention Center in Terre Haute, Indiana. Jamie Ellis from the University of Florida, and Sam Comfort from Anarchy Apiary will be our Plenary Speakers.

We have “Producing Comb Honey” and “Splitting Hives” for some of our breakout sessions along with four workshops. Our workshops are hands-on and include “Building Hive Equipment,” “Wax Rendering,” “How to Make Beeswax Soap,” and a favorite return, “Making Candy Boards.”

Big hits from last year, our Smoker Contest and the Honey Show will be returning; rules can be found on our website listed below.

Cost per member is $40 and $50 for non-members. All children 15 or under may register for $25. You need to be register to attend Friday/Saturday and participate in any of the events. Juice and coffee will be available Saturday morning and your registration includes an Italian buffet lunch.

More Information about the agenda, workshops, directions, link for hotel, etc. has been posted on our website under https://indianabeekeeper.com/events/fall_conference

Q?

Lawrenceburg River Sweep 2022

A.

Meet on Walnut Street by the clock tower by Ivy Tech. Volunteer registration begins at 8:30

Provided: Gloves, buckets, trash pickers, shovels, water and lunch

For protection, wear, bug spray, sturdy boots or tennis shoes and sunscreen

See flyer for additional information.

Q?

Aurora Farmers Fair – SIBA Booth 2022

A.

It's that time of year again when SIBA is setting up our annual booth at the Aurora Farmers Fair. The fair this year is Wed. Sept. 28 through Sat. Oct. 1. Click here to see more details on the Farmers Fair website. We need you! Join your fellow SIBA friends by grabbing a shift. Here's your chance to package up your products from the hive (honey, wax, skin cream, lip balm, etc) and sell it at the booth. Please help us make things run smoothly by understanding a few things. There have been some changes this year to help make the event run more smoothly for everyone.

1. Shifts are "filled" on a first-come, first-served basis. When you fill out the form, we'll get your submissions time stamped in the order they were sent. We ask for your primary and a secondary preference in the event your primary selection is already filled. We will CONFIRM back to you what shift you get. That said, we're not worried about anyone just showing up and hanging out. After all, it's the fair! We just want to make sure the people who committed are there. If you commit to a shift, PLEASE SHOW UP. Often, someone else will have wanted your shift.

2. If you want to sell any of your products, you must work at least ONE shift. In the past, we would accept and sell products at the booth for any of our beekeepers. However, due to changing rules and licensing, etc., you have to be present to sell your product, just like you would be present at a Farmers Market. If you commit to work one shift, we will accept your product, and have it available for purchase during the entire fair. Again, you would commit to working at least one shift. You can bring any products to sell to the September meeting and leave with Jason Morgan or, you can just show up with them for your shift(s). Use this product inventory sheet (print it off) to add your name and contact info, and the products you are sending to the fair. Be sure to sign up for a shift.  The inventory form states the products you left with us, how much it will be sold for at the booth, and how much money (or any unsold product) you will expect back. This sheet and your products arrive together. We mark products up slightly to cover the cost of the booth and space. Like past years, products will be screened and final prices set at the fair! You will get 80% back minus your prorated share of booth expenses. We will have a raffle of bee products and the proceeds will be applied to booth expenses. If you come and work the booth you may push your products but all sales will be through the SIBA sales box. Checked in products belong to the club until settlement. YOU will be responsible for picking up your remaining products at the October bee meeting, or directly with Jason Morgan. We'll let everyone know the various ways to reclaim your products and final check, but we won't be tracking everyone down as hard as we had to last year 😉

3. Make sure all honey products are labeled properly. All honey MUST be in sealed, new containers and labeled with the beekeepers name, contact information (phone and email is adequate) and the weight. Mason jars and plastic jugs are OK, but they have to be clean, no stickiness on the outside, and include the required info stated above.

Q?

Queen Grafting Workshop/Demonstration

A.

Mike Bentz will be hosting a workshop the Saturday after the meeting (Sat. June 18, 10:30am) at his apiary demonstrate the process and show equipment. If you are interesting in knowing better what it take to do this at home even on a hobby basis, this one is for you. The workshop is free to all. Just show up at 10:30am. 8122 Garr Hill Rd., Brookville IN. Park along the road and walk up the driveway.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Dr. Gene Kritsky

A.

We're really excited to have Dr. Gene Kritsky (the Cicada Guy) from Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati to present "Quest for the Perfect Hive". More details are coming soon, so stop back soon to find out more.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Mike Bentz

A.

Dr. Mike Bentz will be presenting part 2 of 2 of “The Queen Production Process”.

Doc Bentz is doing a follow-up presentation to his previous topic with more in-depth discussion on queen rearing. In part one he reviewed some basic equipment and answered questions. For Thurs. Jun 16, he'll wrap-up any questions from part one and briefly describe the grafting process, the shaker box and a finishing colony.

Conveniently, Doc is hosting a workshop the Saturday after the meeting (Sat. June 18, 10:30am) at his apiary to demonstrate the process and show equipment. If you are interesting in knowing better what it takes to do this at home, even on a hobby basis, this one is for you. The workshop is free to all. Just show up at 10:30am.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Jason Morgan

A.

Mite monitoring and control. Jason Morgan and Jeff Ginn will be doing an in-hive demonstration to our hives outside the Sunman Legion. They'll walk through the basics of the mite/bee lifecycle and demonstrate the proper way to to an alcohol wash. We'll talk about the results we find and answer your questions about varroa mites! Bring your veils, a bottle of water and maybe even a chair for this one, and weather permitting, we'll get outside and look into some hives!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Honey House Inspection at Garry Reeves

A.

The Honey house inspection has been cancelled and postponed to Thursday, Feb. 24 at 2pm! Please spread the word!

Q?

Heartland Apicultural Society (HAS) 2022

A.

Register now online! On-campus lodging is available through registration or you can choose hotel options.

Join us in Evansville, Indiana, Tuesday, June 28 – Friday, July 1, 2022 for the return of the HAS conference. Featured speakers will include Dr. Michael Smith – Auburn UniversityDr. Brock Harpur – Purdue University, and Randy Oliver.

Other speakers scheduled to appear:

  • John Benham
  • Jim Berndt
  • Chuck Dailey
  • Brutz English
  • Krispn Given
  • Jerry Hayes
  • David Hocutt
  • Jake Osbourne
  • Charlie Parton
  • Kathleen Prough
  • Tony Rekeweg
  • Debbie Seib
  • Mike Seib
  • Blake Shook

Queen Rearing Class will be conducted by the Purdue Lab led by Krispn Given.

View the tentative schedule online.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Marketing Honey & Indiana Labeling Regulations

A.

Mike and Debbie Seib will visit us from the state organization, the Beekeepers of Indiana. They will present the topic: Marketing Honey & Indiana Labeling Regulations. Whether you sell your honey at farmers markets, or the state or local honey booths, there are a number of requirements to keep in mind when you package and label your honey.

They will also be providing information on Beekeepers of Indiana as well as the upcoming Indiana Bee School XX.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Swarm Prevention for Honey Production

A.

Garry Reeves and Jeff Montag will be demonstrating their methods for “Swarm Prevention for Honey Production”.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Queen Rearing Basics and Equipment

A.

Mike Bentz will be presenting “Queen Rearing Basics and Equipment”.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Growing Your Apiary

A.

Roger Rickabaugh has been keeping bees for 6 years and has 55 hives. He'll discuss how he grew his apiary using swarm traps, splits and swarm queen cells in his topic, “Growing Your Apiary”.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Roundtable Discussion

A.

UPDATE! Change of plans!
Alex has notified us that he is in quarantine due to COVID. He sends his deepest apologies, and wish him well! However, tonight, we'll lead a roundtable discussion around the things we do in July... and around your questions! Bring your questions and let's plan to dig in! See you there!

--

Alex Zomchek from the Miami University entomology department visits us again to do a "utility" presentation. From a high level, his talk will cover seasonal, relevant management practices you can locally implement now.  More specifically, topics will include: B-Curves & B-Time; nectar dearths & nutrition; heat stress mitigation; dialed in pests & diseases monitoring; queen assessments; and more.  This will be a discussion, so bring your questions!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Dr. Mary Green, MD

A.

Have you ever given thought to bee stings, bee venom and it's affect on the human body? Dr, Mary Green, MD, a member of the Clark County Bee Club, will discuss bee stings! A basic talk about local/minor stings and anaphylaxis.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Candy Boards

A.

Jeff Montag will lead a discussion on candy boards! Right on time, these are integral parts to the pre-winter planning! Candy boards offer extra insurance against, colony death from starvation and excess condensation. Jeff will turn it into more of a round-table discussion and your questions and input are encouraged! Bring some paper and a pencil and let's talk candy boards in October! See everyone on Thurs. Oct. 20th!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Dwight Weese

A.

Dwight Weese got his first beehive in 2017 but really only counts himself a semi-successful beekeeper starting 3 years ago. He resides in Mt Healthy, OH and currently has 13 hives located in two apiaries.

Dwight will lead a discussion on 10 things not covered in beekeeping basics. Still a fairly new beekeeper, he'll point out things he has learned that didn't come from the books, videos, or conferences. These points, some humorous, are all related to lessons learned and will hopefully spark similar learnings and further discussion from the club's experienced (or not so experienced) beekeepers.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting and Newsletter

A.

Topic TBA!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Indiana Bee School XX

A.

2022 Bee School will be held on February 26th, 2022 at Horizon Convention Center in Muncie, Indiana.  Cost is $50 for members and $60 for non-members. All registrations include lunch.

Our break out sessions include "Using Technology in Beekeeping", “Beekeeping as a Supplemental Cash Crop", "Races of Honeybees-Characteristics and Traits".

Registration is now open both mail in and online.  This year we will also allow Vendors to register online.

For information about speakers, topics, hotels, and see the registration links, click here.

Q?

Nourishing Connections Meeting/Brainstorming

A.

Do you (or someone you know) have an interest in starting a food business? Let us help you on the journey! Our next meeting is November 30th from 6-8pm at The Galley in Batesville. We will be hearing from Dr. Mishra from Purdue, about food entrepreneurship and food safety laws. For more information, you may contact Kristen Giesting.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Candy Boards

A.

Duane Bischoff will emcee the meeting while Dave Broxterman demonstrates and discusses the all-valuable candy board. If your hives are light on honey going into the winter, the candy board is your friend. We see the candy board as sort of a cheap insurance policy. Let's consider some benefits:

  • If the bees deplete all the honey stores, they hit the candy board and this may help feed them for the remainder of the winter, or at least until you look in the hive again.
  • Condensation is a big concern in the hive. Cold air outside and warm bees inside make moisture. This moisture can collect on the top of the hive. The candy board will absorb most, if not all the moisture into the sugar and likely keep it from dropping back down on to the cluster. Wet bees will die.
  • There is also a hole that passes up through the candy board and a 5/8 inch hole is drilled through the front. See the pictures and the video. Not only does this provide an upper entrance (in the event dead bees clog the lower entrance over the winter), it also allows warm humid air from inside the hive to exit out this hole to prevent condensation in the hive.

Before the meeting, here's some more info, and a video on candy boards. Take a look and bring your questions to the meeting. Let's get ready to "candy up" and overwinter some bees!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

2021 Fall Conference and Workshop

A.

On Friday, October 29th, beginning at 6:00 pm, you'll be able to check-in.  At 7:00 pm, Dr. Selina Bruckner will present on "Varroa Mite Management" and at 8:00 pm Ana Heck on "Evaluating Honey Bee Frames" followed by an ice-cream social.  All of Friday's program will be in the Blue Gate Garden Inn hotel. You must be registered to attend the Friday evening program.  We will allow walk-ins to register on Friday evening for the entire conference; however, the cost is $60 member or non-member.

Saturday, October 30th, along with our two guest speakers, we have some new topic sessions: "Transitioning from Sideliner to Commercial", "Using Technology in Beekeeping", and the basics of "How to Get Started in Beekeeping" and "Hive Inspections and What to Do".

Workshops include building equipment, making candy boards, rendering wax, lighting a smoker, varroa mite treatments, feeding-how and what and installing packages.  Vendors will be onsite to sell you equipment or you can bring your own.

You have the opportunity to be involved in several other events with our Auction and Raffle, Honey Show and Smoker Contest.

To register online, click here.

For a full agenda, directions and registration information, please visit our website at https://indianabeekeeper.com/events/fall_conference.

Q?

Lawrenceburg River Sweep

A.

This Saturday, Sept. 11, there is the annual "river sweep" in Lawrenceburg 9am-1pm. They will be doing a bagpipe salute to veterans and cleaning the river bank. There will be t-shirts and Strongs Pizza is providing the food. Meet at the clock tower by Ivy Tech to register at 8:30am. Provided is: gloves, buckets, trash pickers, water and lunch!

Q?

Mike Bentz doing Cider at Doll’s Orchard

A.

SIBA member Mike Bentz will be doing a cider smash at Doll's Orchard in Oldenburg on Fri Oct 1 and Sat Oct 2. He'll have an observation hive there as well. So, if you can't make the Farmers Fair booth, this is something else going on!

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting & Newsletter

A.

For September, Don Burkart will be wrapping up the round-table discussion started in August covering the behavior topics that were not addressed in the last meeting. Specifically, we will cover behavioral traits;

  • Bearding
  • Washboarding
  • Swarming
  • Floral Fidelity

We'll also discuss club member-submitted traits;

  • Flight training
  • Sound
  • Undertaker
  • Scenting
  • Color triggers
  • Fanning

It was a great discussion in August... so much, that we needed more time to finish it up. Everyone had some great input and we look forward to completing this conversation! We're also hoping at the end of the discussion, we have some people who can speak to genetics... and some of what our local queen breeders are bringing to the table in our area. SE Indiana is one the most capable beekeeping communities in the state!

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If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Saturday In-Hive Workshop

A.

On Saturday August 21st (Sat. after our Aug. meeting,) Dave Broxterman will be doing hive inspections to the two hives at the Sunman Legion. Join us at 12 noon sharp to go through them, observe, ask questions, etc. Bring your veils!

This is a great opportunity to see what you do and what you look for during a typical hive inspection. If you are a new beekeeper or someone who is thinking about getting into beekeeping, this workshop is also for you!

Q?

Pollinator Field Day

A.

POLLINATOR FIELD DAY
SATURDAY, AUGUST 14TH, 2021
9:00 AM—2:00 PM

ECHO HILL FARMS
13133 RIDGE DR.—JUST OFF LAKE TAMBO
RD. SUNMAN, IN 47041
 
9:00 AM — 11:00 AM: SUCCESSFUL BEEKEEPING, HONEY BEES - JIM OREM, SOUTHEASTERN INDIANA BEEKEEPERS ASSOC.
 
11:00 AM —NOON: POLLINATOR HABITAT MANAGEMENT - SAVANNAH DYER STOUT, FARM BILL WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST
 
NOON—1:00 PM: FREE LUNCH
 
1:00 PM — 2:00 PM: INVASIVE MANAGEMENT, CLASSIFIED WILDLIFE PROGRAM, TIMBER STAND IMPROVEMENT - DON DUNCAN, IDNR DISTRICT FORESTER
 
Call 812-926-2406 Ext. 3 Dearborn County Soil & Water Conservation District Or Email [email protected] For Reservations Or More Information.

View, print or download this PDF for all the details

Q?

SIBA at the State Fair August 14th

A.

The Indiana State Fair is coming up fast. August 14th is the day the club is on board to run the Honey booth in the Hort/Ag building. We could use your help! The Fair is the main fundraiser and an important educational opportunity for the Beekeepers of Indiana. It is a good chance for SIBA to raise some funds as well. The club will benefit from your help. Most of what you will do is retail work and no great beekeeping knowledge is required. You get into the Fair for free, work a six hour shift and have the rest of the day for your own fun. The booth makes a great place to regroup and cool down and store things you don’t want to drag around the grounds till you go home. It’s a bit of work selling and talking to a sea of smiling faces and it is a lot of fun. Please come join us!

Contact John Miller to help!

Visit the fair website by clicking here.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Mite Management

A.

For May, Jason Morgan will be covering the topic of varroa mites with an in-hive demonstration. We'll be washing two nucs of bees and then transferring them into 10-frame colonies. Bring your veils and your questions and hope for decent weather.

"The process of monitoring mite loads in a hive is daunting to some beekeepers. Whether it's the seemingly tedious process of getting the best sample, or the math that happens after you have your results, sometimes, measuring mites in the hive just doesn't get done. This has to be the single most important thing you do (at the proper times in the season) for your most successful beekeeping. My goal is to shed light on the process of taking a sample, doing a simple math formula with the number of mites you find, and determining if a hive needs treatment or not. If you take care of the mites, the bees tend to take care of the rest."

Join us Thurs. May 20th at 6:30pm at the Sunman Legion, and bring all your mite questions.

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If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Free Purdue Beekeeping Workshop

A.

Have you ever wondered what it would take to start beekeeping?

Are you already a beekeeper, but would love to ask a fellow beekeeper some questions? If so, this is the program you don't want to miss. Beekeeping basics: How to start beekeeping? How can bees help your garden? Q&A session with experienced beekeeper, Angie Priest has 28+ years beekeeping experience.

This is a free online workshop beginning at 6pm EST via Facebook LIVE @ Purdue Extension-Ohio County Page.

Contact Jill Richards at [email protected] or (812) 438-3656 with questions.

 

 

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Swarm Trapping

A.

Who doesn't want FREE BEES? Duane Bischoff will be leading the timely topic of swarms and swarm catching. He'll cover building a swarm trap (the different types of boxes and materials that are used), and answer the questions of how, where and when to hang them. Once you've caught a swarm, then what? How do you get it home and into a deep hive box to start growing your apiary? Bee scions will also be discussed as an option to try and catch swarms from your own apiary because sooner or later, your bees are going to swarm. Scions and swarm traps help catch both your own bees, and other swarms. Join us in April at the Sunman American Legion and bring your questions!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – From Nuc to Honey!

A.

For March, Jeff Montag presents!

"As a nuc and queen producer, I find that many prospective and new beekeepers have a lot of misgivings about what they should expect in the buildup of their colony.

I plan to present the steps “from start to honey”, for those who I mentor.  The year-plus progression in taking a new colony from start (nuc, swarm, package), with all new equipment, to a honey producing hive.

While it will be targeted for the new beekeepers who are looking forward to that first honey harvest, it will provide great opportunity for our more experienced members to add in their thoughts and how they may vary the steps."

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topics are announced here ahead of each meeting.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting & Newsletter

A.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting & Newsletter

A.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting & Newsletter

A.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Mike Bentz

A.

Dr. Mike Bentz will lead a discussion on practical beekeeping tips and tricks. Mike is also a queen breeder and is part of the Indiana Queen Breeders Association. As we go through several hives in our apiaries, it's nice to have the right things with us... and it's nice to have done the right preparations earlier in the season to benefit from those preparations later when time is short and you have lot's to do.

From combining hives, to adding additional wax to your foundation frames before putting them in your hives... to other practical tips and tricks, Mike will enlighten us!

Bring your questions and maybe Mike will take a second to address it! See you at the Sunman American Legion this Thursday at 6:30pm!

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting & Newsletter

A.

Don Burkart will lead a discussion on honeybee behaviors at our August SIBA meeting. This will be an open discussion where all members are encouraged to share their experiences. Behaviors like aggressive, calm, defensive, hygienic, robbing, bearding, and others will be discussed.

What causes honeybees to exhibit certain behaviors? Can those behaviors be changed? How should a beekeeper prepare for and react to certain behaviors? Are all behaviors due to heredity? Are behaviors a response to a specific stimulus?

Don is a third year beekeeper with 17 hives, and is also the SIBA Librarian.

--

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – David Hocutt

A.

Here is David's Slide Deck that he sent to us from his presentation. We have requested his permission to post only on our website. Please respect the authors request of not posting on any social media platform.

David Hocutt will give a presentation on honey bee biology. He has visited us once in the past and discussed checker boarding. His presentation this Thursday has much information for new beekeepers and the seasoned beekeeper. The presentation will include Honey bee anatomical structures, honey bee communication, honey bee pheromones and the effect they have on honeybees, and honey bee reproduction on an individual and colony level.

David Hocutt is a Certified Eastern Apicultural Society Master Beekeeper. David serves on the boards of the Central Indiana Beekeeping Club, the North Central Beekeeping Club, the Beekeepers of Indiana, and the Eastern Apicultural Society and is a life member of these organizations. David has completed six years of college level courses regarding honey bee health and nutrition and he delights in sharing what he has learned to educate both beekeepers and the general public concerning bees and beekeeping. David will give you a new perspective on bees and beekeeping in an entertaining way.

----

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting – Meadmaking

A.

Post meeting: Download the Meadmaking 101 slide deck

Many of you know our club librarian Don Burkart. He has been a VERY successful first, and second-year beekeeper. What you may not know is that Don is a super-talented winemaker. I couldn't be more thrilled. If you have ever thought about taking up wine or mead-making, this is absolutely not a session to miss!

"Like Zeus, the god Dionysus was raised in a cave and fed on honey. Today he is viewed as the god of wine, but his worship came earlier than wine, from the time when mead was the major alcoholic beverage."

Don has been making wine for over 20 years, and will be sharing a few of his tips and tricks on how to produce mead from honey, an alcoholic drink similar to wine. He will be taking us through step-by-step instructions on the process and will cover some terminology, hardware, and ingredients you will need to make your own 'nectar of the gods'.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. Meetings are held at 6:30pm at the Sunman American Legion unless otherwise stated ahead of time in the newsletter and website. We're also looking for volunteers to help make the club GO. Contact us to let us know you are interested in helping out!

Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Beekeeping in Africa Zoom Workshop

A.

BEE KEEPING IN AFRICA  - zoom workshop

Mark your calendar, and share - our next FREE beekeeping zoom workshop
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87882053471

Date: Saturday, December 19 2020
Time: 10am CST

Presentations

Topic 1: The impact of beekeeping on nutrition and economic strength amongst vulnerable households.
Presented by Oluwaseun Johnson from Nigeria.

And

Topic 2:  Beekeeping in Africa
Apimondia Regional Commission for Africa - President - David Mukomana and President of Apimondia - Dr Jeff Pettis

Thank you

Beatrice Kamau
[email protected]

Q?

SIBA Monthly Newsletter

A.

IMPORTANT: Until further notice, ALL MEETINGS ARE CANCELLED. We will however continue to send out the monthly newsletters prior to the normal meeting date to keep everyone in tune with what they should be doing each month.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

SIBA Meetings would normally occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting. We hope one day to start up meetings again. Check the website or Facebook for the latest information.

Q?

Fall Conference

A.

Hello Members,

Our Fall Conference and Workshop is coming up on October 23rd/24th at Horizon Conference Center in Muncie, Indiana. We have two guest speakers this year.

Dr. Jay Evans is the Research Leader for the USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab in Beltsville, Maryland.  Due to travel restrictions, Jay will only be at the conference on Friday via Zoom.

Our second Keynote Speaker is Kent Williams.  Kent is an EAS Certified Master Beekeeper, the first Master Beekeeper in Kentucky.

Great news, the rates at the hotel have been reduced to $99 a night.  If you have already booked a room, the hotel will automatically correct the rate.

For a full agenda, directions and registration information, please visit our website at https://indianabeekeeper.com/events/fall_conference

Q?

SIBA General Meeting – Overwintering nucs

A.

For the September meeting, we'll hear from Dave Broxterman again! This time, how to over-winter nucs. Dave does a great job at overwintering nucs. We know this because he has donated one each spring for the last several years to be raffled off at our spring meetings.

You can downsize a small colony that is not building up, or perhaps save a late swarm in a nuc. Last season, I actually combined my observation hive with a late swarm that ended up losing its queen. Join us this Thursday as Dave goes over the how's and why's of overwintering nucs.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Q?

Randy Oliver talks about his latest work concerning varroa mites

A.

Randy Oliver, LIVE, talks about his latest work concerning varroa mites- a NY Bee Wellness Webinar

SIBA is not affiliated with this webinar, but the invite is to all. Cost is $10. Find more info and register at the link. Enjoy one of the best from the comfort of home next Wed. night.

Lots of new research. A more user-friendly version of Randy's Varroa Model, the most current mite monitoring and testing of various solutions for mite wash (some surprising findings!), and an update on his selective breeding for varroa resistance, among many other items of interest!

Randy Oliver owns and operates a small commercial beekeeping enterprise in the foothills of Grass Valley in Northern California. He and his two sons manage around 1500 colonies for migratory pollination, and produce queens, nucs, and honey. He has over 50 years of practical beekeeping experience, plus holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in Biological Sciences. Randy analyzes and digests beekeeping information from all over the world, as well as performing field research of his own, in order to not only broaden his own depth of understanding and knowledge, but to develop practical solutions to many of today's beekeeping problems, which he then shares with other beekeepers through his various articles in bee magazines, his speaking engagements worldwide, and on his website ScientificBeekeeping.com

Time: Jun 17, 2020 07:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Registration Fee 10.00
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__28JpTXqQlejYfPZV94R7A

NYBeeWellness.org
a grassroots educational not for profit 501c3 organization

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year.

Garry Reeves and Jason Morgan will lead the topic of mite washes. We'll pull frames from the hives, and shake samples to be washed, then explain what the numbers mean. This is an essential "tool" that is important for ALL beekeepers to fully understand.

Typically, we'd have done this a little earlier in the season, but is it's never too late to do mite washes or take the time to fully understand this topic. Mites are the #1 cause of colony deaths in our area... and particularly for newer beekeepers who may not be watching them closely. After we pull our spring honey harvest, it will be time to dig in and do mite washes to ensure the bees are situated before moving towards the Fall.

Join us at Garry's workshop Thurs. June 18th at 6:30pm, weather permitting.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Dr. Mike Bentz will be discussing with us how to handle a laying worker hive. This is important stuff to be able to identify. If a hive goes queenless long enough, the worker bees can actually develop ovaries and begin laying many unfertilized eggs. This can lead ultimately to collapsed colony. There are things we can do to identify and fix a laying worker hive. Join us this Thursday to learn more!

Q?

Bartholomew County Beekeepers Beginner Beekeeping Event

A.

Our Inaugural Beginner Beekeeping Event at the Bartholomew County Library Red Room.

January 25, 2020 9am to 3pm
(Light Lunch Provided)

This is a free event and all are welcome!
Limited seating and registration required.
Please register one of the following ways:

Text 812-343-7327

Or Email [email protected]

Please Provide:
Name, Number of attendees and contact Info

View/download associated flyer.

Q?

Heartland Apicultural Society Returns to Indiana

A.

HAS 2020 Site Announced

The University of Southern Indiana (USI) will be the site for the next conference of the Heartland Apiculutural Society. The meeting will be held Monday, July 6 through Wednesday, July 8, 2020. Announcements will be coming soon regarding speakers, lodging, HAS queen rearing classes, and more.

USI was host to HAS in 2017. Much of the HAS activities will be held in and around the iconic University Center. Evansville is near the intersection of I-69 and I-64 and convenient to St Louis, Nashville, and Louisville.

Q?

December Meeting – Protecting our Bees – David J. Isenhour, PhD

A.

Join us in December when David J. Isenhour, PhD, presents "Protecting our Bees."

Note: Meeting is at our Winter Location. The Moores Hill Senior Center.

Bio 

Education:

  • BS Biology, Eastern Kentucky University
  • MS Entomology, University of Missouri
  • PhD Entomology, University of Kentucky

Twenty-five years’ experience working in the seed industry. Prior to that – served 10 years on the faculty at the University of Georgia as a tenured Associate Professor of Entomology. Currently an Adjunct Full Professor of Entomology and a member of the Graduate Faculty at the University of Nebraska. Directed graduate students at both institutions. Private sector roles have included Director for Entomology and Pathology for North America, Lead for International Trait Integration, Region Lead for breeding and traits, and regional responsibilities for sales technical support. Lead an R&D team with responsibilities covering 16 countries. Teams lead development and commercialization of Bt-Corn and Roundup Ready Corn in the US, Spain, Argentina, South Africa, Thailand, and the Philippines.

Since March of 2016 serving as Senior Scientist with Ag Ingenuity Partners / Advanced Agrilytics/Ag Ingenuity LLC providing on-farm spatial-based scouting/consulting and contract research.

Author of over sixty referred journal articles and numerous oral/poster presentations. An invited speaker at annual the Entomological Society of America, International Congress of Entomology, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Society of Agronomy. Currently a member of the Entomological Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

SIBA Member Don Richardson will cover Growth Degree Days (GDD), a topic that was covered last winter by David Hocutt when he came to speak about checker boarding as swarm prevention. Many of us have been following GDD to get a better understanding of where we are in the season in order to make decisions about hive management.

Climate differs from region to region... even 20 miles apart. By measuring GDD in your bee yard, there are predetermined benchmarks you can use to know when it is time to checker board, or add supers, etc. Let's get a refresher from Don on Growth Degree Days and go into the next season more cognizant of what the bees are seeing happen around them! See you there.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Note: Meeting is at our Winter Location. The Moores Hill Senior Center.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Pictured above is Ron and his grandson with their first package of bees.

Ron Littiken will be doing a short presentation on the Russian Scion, a tool to help with swarming in an Apiary. He will bring one that he has used with some success as a visual.

Ron has had an interest in honeybees since attending a presentation on beekeeping in September 2016. After talking more with the presenter who had given the presentation, it was clear there was a need for a local beekeeping group. So Ron, his wife and grandson decided to start the Bartholomew County Beekeepers. On March 19 2017, they had their inaugural meeting. About 10 people showed up for the meeting and they have been meeting ever since.

One month later on April 19 2017, they Ron received his first (and last) package of bees and a month later, two nucs. That year, he caught several swarms and by the end of summer, had 9 colonies. Since starting in beekeeping, Ron has experimented with swarm catching, and prevention and his goal is to come top share that experience, along with tips and advice that has been successful for him.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Note: Meeting is at our Winter Location. The Moores Hill Senior Center.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Note: Meeting is at our Winter Location. The Moores Hill Senior Center.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

April is the first Spring Meeting. We're moving back to Garry's Workshop!

Q?

SIBA Monthly Newsletter

A.

SIBA Meetings would normally occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year with topics being added to the event ahead of each meeting.

IMPORTANT: Until further notice, ALL MEETINGS ARE CANCELLED. We will however continue to send out the monthly newsletters prior to the normal meeting date to keep everyone in tune with what they should be doing each month.

If you've missed a previous newsletter, find them all archived here.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting – Winter Prep

A.

Dave Broxterman will be talking about a "Winter Prep Regimen." Wait, what? While it may seem like it's too early to be thinking about winter, there are some important things beekeepers should be doing right now in prep for the fall and winter. Oh, where do we begin?

We need to be wondering if we'll get a fall harvest... and making the moves to get it! We can't say the weather has been completely dry and dearthy. In fact, the season has been more kind to the bees than the previous several.

  • When and how do we evaluate if we'll get a fall harvest?
  • What do we do once we remove our honey?
  • What about handling mites in between all this?
  • What about equipment in need of repair?
  • What other goals do we have for Spring?

The answers to the above depend on YOUR goals. While the goals are different from one beekeeper to the next, the constant is... you need to be making the right decisions that move you closer to your goals. One common goal for all of us are that bees go into the winter with their LOWEST mite load. If the mites are not in check... it will wreck all our spring plans. Now is the time to deal with mites... not the spring. See everyone on Thursday to talk about it!

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Join us in October for our last meeting in Garry's Workshop before we move to the Moores Hill Senior Center. Bob Hornung will focus on uses for honey and beeswax and will have recipes and samples. Hope to see everyone there!

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topic will be announced here ahead of each meeting.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

For November, Jeff Montag presents!

"As a nuc and queen producer, I find that many prospective and new beekeepers have a lot of misgivings about what they should expect in the buildup of their colony.

I plan to present the steps “from start to honey”, for those who I mentor.  The year-plus progression in taking a new colony from start (nuc, swarm, package), with all new equipment, to a honey producing hive.

While it will be targeted for the new beekeepers who are looking forward to that first honey harvest, it will provide great opportunity for our more experienced members to add in their thoughts and how they may vary the steps."

SIBA Meetings occur the 3rd Thursday of each month through the year. Topics are announced here ahead of each meeting.

Q?

Indiana Bee School XVIII

A.

2020 will be a Leap into the next Bee School.

The Bee School will be held on February 29, at Decatur Central High School, 5251 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 46221.

Here are the directions to the school and hotels.  Folder pickup starts at 7:00 a.m. (EST), with the program starting promptly at 8:30 a.m. and concluding around 5:00 p.m.

If you wish to mail in your registration, click here.

Click here for online registration.

Beginning Class

We limit the number of attendees to the beginning class to 200. Cost is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. There are two rooms upstairs that you will be in all day and you are required to wear a wrist band.

Be sure to register for the Beginning Class if that is what you wish to attend as you cannot switch when you get to the school.

Guest Speaker

Marla Spivak is a MacArthur Fellow and McKnight Distinguished Professor in Entomology at the University of Minnesota. She graduated with a B.A. from Humboldt State University and a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas on the identification and ecology of Africanized and European honey bees in Costa Rica.  She is particularly well known for her work, along with Gary Reuter, in breeding lines of honey bees that detect and quickly remove diseased larvae and pupae, which is called hygienic behavior.

Marla was instrumental in setting up the first bee Tech-Transfer Team in the United States, which continues to help honey bee queen breeders select for disease resistance traits.  More recently, she has begun studying the role of resins, which bees collect and mix with wax to make propolis coatings on the inside of their hives, as an example of honey bee social immunity.   Her lab also studies the effect of the surrounding landscape on the health and nutrition of both honey bees and native bees.  Recent awards include the 2015 Minnesota AgriGrowth Distinguished Service Award, the 2016 Siehl Prize laureate for excellence in agriculture, and the 2016 Wings WorldQuest Women of Discovery Earth Award.

Marla's interest in bees began when she worked for a commercial beekeeper in New Mexico in 1975.

Q?

Deadline for Jump Starter Program is Jan. 15, 2020

A.

The deadline for submitting an application is January 15, 2020.

  • Eligible applicants are new beekeepers that are members of TBoI.
  • The applications will come from the local club only.
  • The local club can submit one application per year.
  • Individuals are not allowed to submit an application.
  • A mentor will be provided by the local club for the new beekeeper. The mentor must be a member of TBoI with at least 3 years of experience.
  • If the new beekeeper becomes disinterested, then the local club will be responsible for finding another new beekeeper to use the equipment.
  • The local club will need to submit the name of the new beekeeper to the Jump Starter Committee.
  • Regional Director will submit the reports to the board of directors before each board meeting.
  • Jump Starter Committee will review applications and Chairman will notify local club on application approval.
  • Jump Starter Committee will have final say on application approval.
  • The board of directors is required to vote on the continuation and funding of this program at the third quarter board of directors meeting each year.
  • Mentor and new beekeeper will be required to provide a quarterly written report and pictures to their Regional Director. Failure to comply will forfeit 2021 eligibility.

Provided by The Beekeepers of Indiana

  • Hive Bodies - unassembled
  • Frames and foundation (plastic or wax), unassembled
  • 100 Support Pins with plastic foundation
  • 1 Screen bottom board
  • 1 Entrance reducer
  • 1 Inner cover
  • 1 Wood & Metal Telescoping Cover
  • 1 Quad Top Feeder
  • 1 Smoker
  • 1 Bee Brush
  • 1 J–hook hive tool

Provided by the Local Club

  • 1 Package of Bees
  • 1 Protective Clothing
  • Mentor

For application and more information, download this PDF file.

Send to:
Jump Starter Program
7784 N. Sanctuary Lane
Mooresville, IN 46158–6082
Attn: Debbie Seib

For questions email Chairman – Debbie Seib at [email protected]

Q?

Beekeepers Christmas Party

A.

Hey everyone, we've set the Christmas party this year for Friday, Dec. 20th at 6:30pm.

Note: The Christmas party this year will be held at the Moores Hill Senior Center.

Like always, bring a dish to share, be it an appetizer, dessert...  or anything else that fit's your fancy. Just to give you an idea, I myself will be bringing a selection of home-made wine, fermented things and whatever the latest cured meat and cheeses are ready. Home made is always a treat as we like to see your culinary talents. Pictured above is the awesome honeycomb cake that someone brought a couple years back. Sorry I can't remember the name, but I'm sure someone will chime in.

The Christmas party is a fun opportunity to celebrate and reflect on the beekeeping season. Most favorite for me is catching up and chatting with everyone since there is more time than just the break at the meetings. We know this is a busy time of year for everyone so, we settled on a Friday in hopes it may make it more likely to make it. Look forward to seeing everyone and while it seems funny to say right now... Season's Greetings, we hope the season was kind to you... and that the winter is kinder 🙂

Q?

Fall 2019 Wine Making Class with Walt Huber

A.

This is the information about the next beginning winemaking course being taught this fall 2019.  We have a new venue this fall.  The classes will be in Lawrenceburg, Indiana at the town civic center.  The address is 311 West Main Street Lawrenceburg, IN 47025. All five of the classes will be on Tuesdays.  The class dates are:  10/29/2019, 11/26, 12/10, 01/21/2020 and 02/18.  This last class date is tentative and might be moved.  Each class should run from 7:00 PM to about 9:00 PM.

Each student is offered the opportunity to make a batch of wine during the course.   This is not required to take the course, but I feel it is more fun learning swimming in the water, and I think this applies to winemaking as well.  For this reason, the course dates are scattered across several months.  It takes this long for the wine to complete.  I’m estimating that the topics of each class will occur at about the time in the process they are needed.  In the case where friends (spouses, significant other, etc.) are attending, they may make one batch together, or they may decide to each make one.

The course will begin with the basics and follow with topics in the sequence of events where they occur in the winemaking process.  Most classes have a few students who have made wine, but most are beginners.  We attempt to cover both the basics and some advanced topics to meet the needs of both groups.

I charge a nominal tuition fee of $20.00 for the entire course.  This will help me cover the cost of materials.  As with any hobby, it takes a little bit of money to get into it.  If you are already a wine (or beer) maker, you may have most of the equipment.  If not, it takes about $100 for the basic equipment and it will also take money for the ingredients to make the class project.  As you go along, there are other items you may want that either make the process easier or help you make better wine. We will discuss basic and advanced equipment during the course.  Winemaking equipment and supplies can be purchased locally.  We will discuss this in the first class.

I envision the class project to be a wine made from a winemaking kit containing juice and/or concentrate or a bucket of juice.  We will discuss this at the first class. These can run anywhere from about $60 to $150, and probably higher if you want to look far enough.  In theory, the more expensive kits will make a better wine (at least according to the supplier of them).   I wouldn’t guarantee that, but I’m sure that is a general truth.  You can decide what kind of wine and what grade you’d like to make.  So far the wines made but the students using all levels of kits have been very drinkable!

Most handouts for the course will be distributed electronically via e-mail.

If you’d like to join in this winemaking class or have questions, please contact me at the phone numbers or e-mail address below.

Sincerely,

Walt Huber
H: 513-677-8468  (VINT)
E: [email protected]

Q?

Indiana Honey Queen program Deadline

A.

Reminder to all young ladies 18-24 who are interested in the Indiana Honey Queen program, the deadline for submitting your application is October 10th.

This is an amazing opportunity for a wonderful year of making memories as a spokesperson for all the beekeepers of Indiana while networking and gaining experiences that will help through your entire life!  Public speaking, poise, and confidence are just a few of the qualities you'll attain and you'll use as you become a leader in your chosen field.

Attached are the rules and application form and they need to be returned to Kristy Dooley by the 10th of October. Please contact her with any questions.

View and download the PDF

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Preparing your hives for winter

Summer is slipping away, and we're easing into Fall. One might think that the beekeeping season is winding down, but nothing could be further from the truth! Right now, we're thinking about equipment that may need swapped out and brought in for repair. We're thinking about making candy boards. We're thinking about hive weight, feeding regimens, mouse guards, and that potential surplus that is your Fall honey harvest!

The goldenrod flow is on so stinky hives are a good thing! Are your bees healthy and ready for winter? Join us in September as Dave Broxterman tells us how to prepare our hives for the winter!

Q?

Aurora Farmers Fair 2019

A.

The Aurora Farmers Fair will be here before you know it. The fair runs from Wed. Oct. 2 through Sat. Oct. 5 and the theme this year is "Celebrating Auror's 200 Years! Aurora's Bicentennial"

Get your honey into bottles, make your wax candles and other creations from the hive and be ready to sell them at the SIBA booth. The volunteer sign-up form is below for you to claim your spot! Please note, shifts are first-come, first-served. So, when you sign up, we'll get back to you to confirm your shift. If you have a friend that you want to work with, it's best to get with them and sign up at the same time. View the CONFIRMED SHIFT LIST.

Take a look at the pricing model below for all products sold at the booth. Also included within are the honey bottling guidelines.

We have price adjustments for products that will be sold at the booth to accommodate the cost of the booth rental and to get the beekeeper back a fair price for their product. So, in most cases, your products will be marked up slightly. To give you an idea, a 1 pound plastic bottle of honey will cost $9 to the public. The beekeeper would get back $7.47. When you check in your product, we will take inventory, answer your questions and make sure you know how much you'll get back in the end. If you have any questions, ASK!

2019 Booth/Beekeeper Product Pricing and Guidelines

 

Your honey must be bottled to these guidelines:

  • Be in a clean bottle, with no sticky honey on the outside
  • Have your name and contact information on the bottle (phone and email)
  • The net weight of the honey clearly marked on the bottle.

Q?

Food & Grower’s Association Annual Meeting and Gathering

A.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019, 6:30 PM, all FGA members, and the public are invited to attend the annual meeting, to be held at the Pavilion at Liberty Park in Batesville.  This meeting will be held in conjunction with our September Community Gathering.

This special gathering will feature a taco bar, prepared by Big Four Cafe.  There will be a vegetarian option.  All tableware and drinks will be provided as well.

Our guest speaker is Nate Brownlee.  Nate has been farming since 2009 and is very active in farm life and farm networking.  His experience includes shearing sheep in Maine, caring for cattle in New York and slaughtering chickens in Vermont.  He prefers to spend time caring for and working with animals in a pasture.   Nate, and his wife, Liz, own and operate Nightfall farm near Seymour Indiana.  Nate and Liz started a chapter of Young Farmers in Indiana and are involved statewide in supporting and networking with all farmers.  Nate was hired by the FGA in 2016 to coordinate SIFTI - our farmer training program. Nate’s talk is titled “A Future with Farmers”.

All this for the one low price of your potluck dish!  Please bring a dish prepared with local, sustainable, whole foods if possible.  Appetizers, salads and desserts will complement the taco bar!  Don’t want to cook? The price is $10 at the door per person for the public, $5 at the door per person if you are a member of FGA.

Reservations are appreciated by September 13 and can be made by calling Deanna Hookway at 812-212-5432 or emailing: [email protected]  Please indicate if you will bring a dish or pay at the door.  Said you were coming but cannot make it?  RSVP regrets to the same address by September 16.

If you are interested in participating on the Board of Directors of FGA or want to learn more, please submit your name to [email protected] by September 13th.

Who:  The Food & Growers Association
What:  The 2019 Annual Meeting
When:  September 18, 6:30 PM
Where:  The Pavilion at Liberty Park in Batesville
Why:     Learn about "A Future with Farmers" from Nate Brownlee
RSVP to [email protected]com

Agenda:
6:30 ~ Dinner
7:15 ~ Annual Business Meeting and Board Member Voting
7:30 ~ Speaker

Q?

Fall Conference and Workshops

A.

The 2019 Fall Conference and Workshops will be held in French Lick, Indiana at the Historic French Lick Springs Hotel.

Randy Oliver will be a keynote speaker. SIBA draws a lot of knowledge from Mr. Oliver and the Fall Conference is your chance to finally meet him. Randy started keeping bees as a hobbyist around 1966 and now keeps around 1000-1500 hives with his two sons.  Randy has university degrees in biological sciences, specializing in entomology. In 2006, Mr. Oliver began writing articles for the American Bee Journal.  He has traveled all over the world talking and working with beekeepers.

Be sure to mark your calendar for our 2019 Fall Conference on October 25/26, 2019 and for more information, visit the Beekeepers of Indiana website.

Q?

SIBA Beekeepers Picnic 2019

A.

The beekeeper's picnic will take place at Mike Bentz' house on Sat. Sept. 21, located at 8122 Garr Hill Rd. Brookville Indiana, 47012.

Mike will open things up with an apple cider making beginning at 7am. Bring some apples to run through his press and take home some cider! Clean containers will be provided!

Deno Koumoutsos will play us some live music.

At 11 am, Mike will begin frying up his famous chicken and we will eat at noon. You provide sides, appetizers or salads and SIBA will provide fried chicken, potato wedges, soft drinks and water. BYOB. There's usually a tour of the gardens and whatever else the doc is in to. Also an opportunity to go to Mike's farm and root through his hives, As always, bring a veil. Bring the family and we'll see you there!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Jason Morgan will be leading a presentation and discussion on mite mitigation miticides and treatment methods. When do you treat? How do you treat? Will you try to be as natural as possible, or will you use synthetic treatments like Apivar?

There's a variety of treatments available on the market that can get expensive, especially if you have many hives to treat. There are also options like formic and oxalic acids that are cheaper and less synthetic, but still un-natural. If you are the proactive type, you can use natural brood breaks and removal earlier in the season to knock mites back, but is this enough? What is the threshold of bees to mites ratios? How does one test to see if they have mite overloads?

There are many options and even more questions. Bring your questions and let's talk about them at the August SIBA meeting.

Q?

Purdue Extension Small Farm Education Field Day

A.

Purdue Ext. Small Farm Education Field Day. Basic planning tools for a sustainable small farm operation. Topics include testing and restoring soils in urban and peri-urban systems, scheduling crops in high tunnels, cover crops for your soil, calculating profit and ROI, and food safety planning.

Composting, high tunnel, vegetable wash stations, and solar dryer demonstrations available in the afternoon.

Lunch is free.

Q?

Weed Walk – Learn your Forage

A.

Chandra Mattingly and Velda Miller will lead us on a weed walk June 22 at 10:30 am at Echo Hill Farm 13133 Ridge Drive, Sunman,IN.

This property has been family managed for many years for pollinators and wildlife. Rocky Schroeder will be on hand to answer any management questions.

Q?

Local Tractor Supply Market Day

A.

SIBA member Leslie Andres sent me this information and said she was happy to participate last year.

"I was surprised how much I sold in a short period of time, both honey and 1 oz wax blocks. No cost to set up a table and they could also sell other things like eggs & Maple syrup."

- Leslie A.

Partner with your local Tractor Supply Company store to participate in a Market Day Event on Saturday, May 18, 2019. The participation registration window will close Wednesday, May 15, 2019 for this event.

Immediately upon completing your registration, a confirmation email will be sent to you and the store manager. Within a few days, the store manager or an event coordinator will contact you to work out details for your event date. Some stores may have space or other restrictions that may limit the ability to accommodate multiple groups. Therefore you must confirm details and scheduling with the store manager before arriving at the store on the event date.

Sign up now

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Bring your veils for the first Spring meeting back at Garry's workshop. Jason Morgan will be demonstrating the alcohol wash to get an accurate count of mites in your beehive. If the weather cooperates, we'll get in a hive or two and walk through the process of taking a sample of bees and testing them for mites.

Broken down to its simplest form, we want to get the number of mites per 100 bees. However, instead of just taking 100 bees (one sample,) we'll take 300 bees (three samples). A level half-cup measuring cup is approximately 300 bees. We'll show what you need, and demonstrate the proper technique of swirling and washing the bees to make your test most accurate.

Bring your veils, a notepad, and your questions, and see you there!

Selecting the best brood frame to sample at Dave Rieman's last year.

Jason explaining the mite wash at a Sat. Field Day at Dave Rieman's last year.

 

 

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Topic to be announced here. Stop back soon!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Jim Orem returns to talk about feed and feeding. When should you feed, and why? To build comb, stimulate the queen and store honey, the bees need a nectar flow. Without it, they can't do much.

There are several schools of thoughts on feeding. On one hand, sugar is artificial and the bees can't easily assimilate and digest it. On the other hand, the dearthy seasons we see here in SE Indiana sometimes require it... and unless your apiary has something in bloom nearby, your hives can plateau and see various problems.

There are several methods of feeding as well. Jim will bring several feeding devices, but invites anyone who has a favorite feeder or system, to bring it and be prepared to talk about a little about it.

Don't forget, Saturday June 22, the Sat. following bee-meeting-Thursday, we have the Weed Walk. This is a perfect opportunity to understand more of the plants that provide nectar to allow you to predict when it may be necessary to feed your bees due to a lack of forage in bloom.

Hope to see you in June!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Dwight Wells returns to provide an update on feral honey bee mite-chewing behaviors. He will bring several digital microscopes to the meeting to check mites SIBA members have collected from screen bottom board slides. So bring in some dead mites!

Mites can be collected from feral swarm colonies and other non-feral colonies for comparison of chewing percentages.

Propagating the best genetics into our local bee population is the best thing we can do in our battle against varroa. Hygienic bees sense varroa and actively groom the mites of each other, and even go as far as biting them. One bite causes a wound that the mite can't recover from and it will bleed to death.

We always like hearing from Dwight and the Purdue "ankle-biters."

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

If you have been in beekeeping for very long you will find that much of it is redundant: wash, rinse repeat.  You then look for little hints, tips, and tricks to look at your bees in new ways.  Join us at the October meeting where our guest speaker (Alexander Zomchek, Miami University) will take a quick glance over our seasonal shoulders; square the here and now; and make suggestions for the next 30-45 days that will help to fortify your bees as well as prepping hives for fall into winter.

This is the last seasonal hurrah and you want to take advantage of it.  Continuing with his Monitoring Approach (originator of the Apiary Diagnostic Kit-ADK) Alex will also introduce some gadgetry as well as demo his new "hive smock" to aide in thorough and enlightening bee inspections.

Alex Zomchek: Bee-Bio
Beekeeping is a lifelong passion for Alex with him building his own hives at the age of 10. He began his professional career bringing his interests in mathematics/computer modeling interests to medical research helping him to invent the field of teleradiography (digital body imaging and transmission).

With the introduction of varroa mites Alex turned his attention to honey bee research which he conducts out of Miami University’s Ecology Research Center located in Oxford, OH (home of Larenzo Langstroth – inventor of the modern beehive). He currently divides his time between developing tools and techniques to improve honey bee stock. Current research ranges from better open mating models to closed systems models using instrumental insemination and cryogenic germplasm.

He is equally interested in creating monitoring materials and educating beekeepers (e.g. he is the originator of the Apiary Diagnostic Kit used by the Ohio State Beekeepers Association). He runs a string of “latitude” beelabs from Florida to northern Wisconsin to accelerate honeybee lines. Alex is a national speaker bringing his love of science and bees to the public leaving most audience members wanting to become citizen scientists as he will freeze or burn something in a presentation given half a chance and fire codes permitting.

He is currently the President of the Butler County Beekeepers Association and is a Director for the Ohio State Beekeepers Association which has awarded him the title Master Beekeeper - Instructor. He also just received the North America’s Develbiss Award for outstanding contributions to honey bee education and research.

Find out more about Alex here.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

We're changing it up this meeting. Have you developed a tool or method, or something that makes beekeeping better or more efficient for you? If so, bring it to the meeting and tell us about it. We'll have some tables set up to walk around and see what others are doing. We think this will get people talking and thinking about ways to improve their beekeeping the next season.

Pictured above is Dave Broxtermans' nuc-top OA vaporizer. Come see how it works at the November SIBA meeting! Hope to see everyone there!

Q?

Instrumental Insemination – Architecture of a Successful Breeding Program

A.

Sponsored by the Indiana Queen Breeders Association (IQBA) https://www.iqbaindiana.com

At the Purdue University Honey Bee Laboratory August 22 and 23 - 9:00 am to 5:00 pm
The class is designed for beekeepers and researchers who want to improve their population of honey bees and maintain a breeding program with improved survivability for their area. The goal is to disseminate current information and techniques; therefore, classes are kept small (6) students. Detailed instruction and hands-on practice of semen collection and insemination of queens will be emphasized and facilitated with the use of a video camera. Queen and drone biology lecture will be presented along with the preparation and care of virgin queens and drones. Virgin queens and drones will be provided for the students. Successful queen rearing skills are a prerequisite. Provision of your own insemination equipment is required. Microscopes will be provided for use upon request with a $25 rental fee. Students will be able to take their successfully inseminated queens� home, to see if they survive. Cost of the two-day interactive course is $800.

For more information, go here, and SCROLL DOWN.

Q?

Purdue Queen Rearing Short Course

A.

This is a course designed for those who want to learn the art of queen rearing using the larval transfer technique (Grafting). The two and ½ day course will be at the Purdue Honey Bee Laboratory and will finish on the day of the TBOI summer meeting.

Those attending the course will get a video (DVD) with their queen rearing manual (Spivak and Reuter) demonstrating the queen rearing techniques. Enrollment is limited to 30 students with their own veil and protective suit, so register early!!! Pre-registration is required.

Q?

Heartland Apicultural Society

A.

HAS will return to Bowling Green, Kentucky for the 2019 conference.  Join us following your Independence Day weekend, Monday – Wednesday, July 8-10, 2019

Western Kentucky University offers great convenience for HAS attendees with almost all activities in one building on their beautiful campus.

Watch for more details here.

Q?

Purdue Field Day

A.

Beekeepers of Indiana presents, Alive and in the Hive.

It is a great follow up to the fantastic Indiana Bee School XVII.  Once again, we'll be in the hives with no guest speaker.

Remember to bring your protective gear as a hat/veil are required to be in the apiary.  We will have a few extra on site if you do not have any.

Didn't get The Beekeepers of Indiana attire, don't worry, we'll have it at the Bee Lab.

For more information, see here.

Q?

Crop Marketing and Farm Finance Workshop

A.

Consider attending the upcoming Crop Marketing and Farm Finance Workshop to be held on March 8 starting at 9:30am at the Brookville Public Library located at 919 Main Street in Brookville, IN. This workshop includes two ninety-minute sessions that will prepare you to meet with your ag lender and assist you in improving your crop marketing skills.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Jim Orem will be speaking on the topic of swarm catching and swarm traps. Jim is known as the authority on swarm catching here at SIBA and each year, we ask him to update us on what is new. He has a regular regimen of making rounds to 40+ swarm traps he has spread out around the area and catching so many, he often has a surplus that he sees into the hands of new beekeepers getting started.

There really is an ideal size and location for a swarm trap. Jim will tell you how you can improve your success on trapping swarms. Free local bees are the best bees you can get, so don't miss this one!

Q?

Garry’s Final Winter Workshop

A.

Join us Saturday Mar. 2 for Garry's Final winter workshop. Again, we'll be showing how to make hive bodies and repair equipment. If you have frames to assemble, bring them over and we'll help get them done.

Anyone is welcome to come and observe and help. Don't forget your safety glasses. See you there!

Q?

Growing Together – 2019 FGA Winter Conference

A.

Get tickets and more details at https://www.foodandgrowers.com/

Q?

Garry’s Winter Workshop #1 2019

A.

Hey everyone, so far, this is the first and only winter workshop scheduled at Garry's. Schedules are crazy, so Garry will have to see if we can do another one in Feb. Keep your ears open and we'll let you know ahead of time.

In the meantime, if you are looking to get a better understanding on what it takes to build some of your own equipment, plan to attend. If you've never attended a workshop before, we recommend you come help and learn what kind of wood and materials you need to bring for the next workshop. If you already know what you need, feel free to bring it, and Garry and his helpers will help you turn it into the equipment you need. Don't forget your safety goggles! Happy to answer any questions you may have... just ask here.

Q?

Indiana Bee School XVII

A.

The Indiana Bee School XVII will be held on February 23, 2019 at Decatur Central High School in Indianapolis, Indiana. If you are a member, you will receive a $10 reduction in price.

On Saturday, we have a beginning beekeeping class, that is limited to 200 students. If you want to attend this class, be sure to register with the correct selection as you will be unable to switch at the school from the regular school to the beginning class or once the beginning class is full.

Go here for more information and to register. The beginning beekeeper class is limited to 200 and it always fills FIRST!

Q?

SIBA Christmas Party

A.

The SIBA Christmas Party will be held on Sat. Dec. 8 at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop. This is the second Saturday in December. We know that this is a popular weekend for company Christmas parties, but It's the only Saturday that was available in December for the hosts to manage.

Please bring a dish (a main dish, appetizer, or dessert to share. If you are a wine or mead-maker, bring along one of your latest to share. We'll have some small dixie cups to sample with. As in the past, Jason will have a sample of wine, cheese and cured meats to try. We've also seen some pretty creative desserts come from our membership at past Christmas parties. If you have some pickled, or canned creations, this is a time to share with others.

The primary goal of the Christmas party is to celebrate and reflect on the season, both successes and failures... and talk about them with great company and some good food and drink. We're firming up some other details and will share them here as they become available.

We hope to see you there, and Happy Holidays!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Back by request, Jason Morgan will lead a discussion on mead-making. So you managed to get a good honey harvest, and you happen to have a couple extra gallons of honey. Have you ever thought about making mead with your honey? Mead is very similar to a fruit wine, but the sweetener used is honey instead of sugar. Just like in winemaking, there are many styles of mead that vary depending on the fruit used and the process employed.

This is a great winter-time topic. Jason will show the basic 10 things you need to make wine and mead (and you will likely have several of these items at home already), and then walk through the process from beginning to end.

Bring your questions and let's talk mead in December!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Jason Morgan will cover the topic of making and using candy boards over the winter. This meeting is geared towards newer beekeepers who may be wondering what a candy board is, how to make one, and when to use one. The candy board will help provide winter food for your bees, while also doubling as a moisture-wicking mechanism at the top of the hive and will prevent condensation from dripping back down onto the bee cluster. Aside from the candy board, we'll talk about wind-breaks, mouseguards and other things to consider as we put the bees to bed for the winter months. As always, bring your questions.

Attention: The November meeting is the last meeting at Garry's Workshop before we move to the Moores Hill Senior Center for our winter meetings starting in December!

 

Q?

Workshop: Best Management Practices for Pollinators

A.

Indiana University
Indiana Memorial Union

This workshop will provide an overview of the natural history and basic identification of pollinators and will focus on management practices that support or that may negatively affect pollinators and other beneficial insects. The course will detail how to provide food and shelter for pollinators and address management actions such as grazing, mowing, controlled burning and pesticide use.

Course participants will conduct a field tour to see pollinator habitat and discuss best management practices on site.

This course will increase the ability of land managers to:

  • Distinguish bees from other insects
  • Assess natural areas as functional pollinator habitat and identify opportunities for increasing pollinator and other beneficial insect diversity
  • Understand best management practices that minimize land-use impacts on pollinators
  • Make recommendations on management and restoration practices to conserve pollinators

Presenters:

Rich Hatfield, Senior Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Bumble Bee Lead,  Xerces Society

Scott Hoffman Black, Executive Director, Xerces Society

Stephanie Frischie, Agronomist / Native Plant Materials Specialist, Xerces Society

---

Want to learn about how to manage natural areas for the benefit of pollinators?  Join the Xerces Society for a full-day workshop focused on concepts to protect and enhance populations of pollinators in natural areas and other wild landscapes.

This workshop is part of the programming being offered during the 2018 Natural Areas Conference, October 23-25, 2018.  Attendees can sign up as part of their conference registration or can sign up to attend only this workshop.

Register for workshop only

Q?

Field Day: Alcohol Wash to get Accurate Mite Count

A.

Join us at Dave Rieman's apiary to learn how to conduct alcohol washes to get accurate mite counts on your hives. Jason Morgan will conduct multiple alcohol washes to get an accurate mite count on each hive and discuss each step as we walk through it together. We'll talk about the best frames to shake to get a good sample of mites and if the hives need to be treated, we'll discuss the options and decide what to do.

There are several methods of getting mite counts on your hives, but each seems to have their individual nuances that often dissuade beekeepers from being diligent and getting those numbers. Sticky boards and sugar shakes either take multiple trips to the apiary or have more complicated math to get the final count (which is the number of mites per 100 bees).

Practicing listening to bees using a stethoscope. This helps hear bees through walls and other cavities when we do cut-outs and removals.

Yes, the alcohol wash will kill a sample of your bees, but it does give you a highly accurate count of mites per 100 bees. One might argue that it is better to kill the sample of bees than to allow your hive die a slow death from virii vectored by mites. These include the most common, deformed wing virus (DWV), Parasitic Mite Syndrome (PMS), and unfortunately, many more. When mite loads get high, all sorts of things happen in the hive. The bees are sick, and so they respond just the way we would if we were sick. They underperform, and cannot ever seem to get back on top of the chores of the hive. The result is watching a hive that seems to struggle along but never get to that honey-producing hive that we strive for.

We work to keep mite counts at or below 2 mites per 100 bees. We've also found that when we can keep these counts closer to this level, hives start taking care of themselves and ultimately impress us with their strength and honey-producing abilities.

Dave also has some queens that need to be marked so if you have any questions on queen-marking, it'll be a good opportunity to talk about them too.

Join us, bring your veils, and your questions and see you there!

9338 St.Rd. 62 Dillsboro, IN 47018.
Disregard the road closure signs.
Call 812-432-3995 or 812-655-3920 with any problems on directions.

Q?

Purdue Field Day

A.

A great follow up to the fantastic Indiana Bee School XVI.  We've heard from many of our members who would like to be able to spend more time in the hives, so we will not have a guest speaker this year.

What we will have is three sessions of hands-on training.  It will be updated as we confirm more of our instructors.

Lunch will be catered by Country Home Cooking and they bring a quality continental breakfast as well.

Didn't get that Beekeepers of Indiana attire, don't worry, we'll have it at the Bee Lab.

Remember, if you are a member, you receive $10 off the registration price. The cost is $25 for members, $35 for non-members and $15 for children.

For more information, visit the Beekeepers of Indiana website, or contact:

Matt Evans
10555 E 400 S
Zionsville, IN   46077
317-373-5178
[email protected]

Q?

Heartland Apicultural Society 2018

A.

The July 11-13, 2018 program schedule includes:

  • Classes for all skill levels
  • Bee-yard activities (bring your veil)
  • Queen rearing classes (limited enrollment)
  • Evening events:
  • Wednesday: Dinner and free movie night "Ulee's Gold"
  • Thursday: Anheuser-Busch Brewery dinner and tour
  • Friday: Saint Louis Zoo dinner and visit
  • Vendors

Click here: open agenda

Early registration rates and availability to book dorm rooms end June 15, 2018. Are you registered? Want to be a vendor? Download online application.
Thanks to our sponsors; sponsorship opportunities still available.
Follow us on Facebook and share with your friends!Give Mom a registration to our annual conference in St. Louis July 11-13, 2018, makes a great Mother's Day gift!

Meet you in St. Louis July 11-13, 2018!

Q?

June Field Day: Queen grafting workshop at Garry’s

A.

For the Saturday workshop after the June meeting, we'll meet at Garry's at 8:00 am and Mark Montag will lead us in queen grafting. He'll be leading a hands-on demonstration on the process of grafting and using a starter and finisher box. Anyone who is going to be there Saturday will be able to practice grafting.

Bring your veils!

Q?

Beekeeping Workshop

A.

Have you ever wondered what it would take to start beekeeping? Or are you currently collecting honey and would be interested in marketing it?

Purdue Extension is offering a beekeeping workshop to help new and experienced beekeepers. Come with all of your questions to learn more about beekeeping.

For more information or to register contact the Purdue Extension Office

View/download Flyer with more detail

Q?

Chan’s Plant Sale

A.

Download Chandra's PDF for details.

Close to the traffic light at main and high streets.

Q?

Chan’s Plant Sale

A.

Download Chandra's PDF for details.

Close to the traffic light at main and high streets.

Q?

SIBA at the Indiana State Fair

A.

SIBA will be manning the booth in the Ag/Hort building on Sat. Aug. 11. The day is divided into two shifts... morning and afternoon. The booth needs 10 people per shift.

As educations is a primary goal of TBoI, we need to do two education spots.  At 11am in the booth will be a youth-focused program of our choice. There is a program available for us to use if we need. At 5pm on the main stage in the Ag-Hort building (same building) a presentation of our choice of Bee topics that should run an hour in length. Of course, some of that time can be used for Q&A. TBoI has an assigned committee member to assist us!

We will be looking for an observation hive for the day as well. Whoever brings the observation hive gets a free parking pass. The Beekeepers of Indiana will provide us up to 20 admission tickets for workers.

 

If you can help, contact John Miller or Jason Morgan and let them know!

Visit the State Fair website

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

For April, we meet back at Garry's workshop... and who better to host our April topic than Garry himself? Garry will be telling us how to evaluate queen bees. What makes a good or bad queen? What should you look for? We all know that while the queen really doesn't rule the hive, it still takes a vigorous, healthy queen to make the best hive. Weather permitting, we'll be getting into some hives too. Bring your veils!

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. We'll update the topic here ahead of time. Stop back soon.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Garry Mullen will bring in a 10-frame Langstroth hive where he uses a division board to reduce it to the size of a nuc and then expand the box as needed. We'll open it up to Q&A, so bring your questions and let's talk about them. Also, bring your veils in the event it's a nice day. Never know if we'll get into some hives at Garry's.

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. We'll update the topic here ahead of time. Stop back soon.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Mark Montag will be doing an informative presentation on how to graft queens and run a small queen rearing operation, as well as knowing what tools to use. Then on the 23rd (The Saturday workshop after the meeting) at 8:00am at Garry’s House, he'll be doing a hands-on demonstration on the process of grafting and using a starter and finisher box. It's free for all and anyone in attendance there Saturday will be able to practice grafting. Bring your veils and hope to see you there.

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. We'll update the topic here ahead of time. Stop back soon.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Gary Mullen will lead the topic on varroa mites! The varroa mite is a beekeepers biggest concern. 80% of colony failures can be attributed to the varroa mite. When mites are not in check, a variety of issues plague the hive. In this meeting, we'll talk about the ways to monitor for mites (including the alcohol wash) and what to do if you find the levels are above the ideal threshold.

This meeting is a precursor to the field day workshop being held at Dave Rieman's apiary on the following Saturday where we'll conduct live alcohol washes on multiple hives.

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. We'll update the topic here ahead of time. Stop back soon.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Dr. Mike Bentz will be presenting the topic small hive beetle (SHB) and honey labeling guidelines. Two things that are timely as ever. SHB continues to be a real pest in the hive. As beekeepers bring in their honey, it's important to think about how it is stored until it is slung. In the past, we'd let it air out in the honey house. Now days, honey that is not guarded by bees is subject to the "sliming" of SHB. Will you sling it fast, freeze it, or something else? Mitigation of SHB in the hive is typically a multi-pronged approach. Let's talk about it!

Now that you have some honey, what will you do with it? Will you sell any to friends, family or via the local Farmer's Market? There are some basic guidelines you'll need to follow to keep yourself legal and out of trouble. Dr. Bentz will also go over this information. Bring your questions and see you there.

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. We'll update the topic here ahead of time. Stop back soon.

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

Dave Broxterman will lead a topic on overwintering nucs. Are there pros and cons to overwintering nucs? What is needed, and how late is it to do? Bring your questions and we'll talk about them. Dave has been generous numerous times in the past donating one of his spring nucs to the club for raffle. Thanks Dave!

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. There are no dues. If you are even thinking about getting honey bees, come to a meeting and learn a little first!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting – October

A.

Chris Whipple from Diversified Services will be discussing a new Apiculture insurance program. This product was just released in our area. Chris will cover all of the aspects of this new federally subsidized program. Many beekeepers have implemented various risk management techniques to help alleviate some of the effects of drought; however, the beekeeping industry historically has not been able to participate in subsidized federal crop insurance programs. While the program is new, you can take advantage of the available government subsidies and implement a solid risk management tool to help offset some of the effects of drought.

Chris Whipple
Cell: (812) 560-1340
Toll Free: (800) 833-1796
Fax: (812) 663-6907

Meetings are held the 3rd Thursday of each month at 6:30pm at Garry's Workshop in Moore's Hill. Open to the public. There are no dues. If you are even thinking about getting honey bees, come to a meeting and learn a little first!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting

A.

David Hocutt will be joining us to talk about "checkerboarding," a management technique to prevent swarming. We've used the term checkerboarding in our club in the past to talk about alternating brood frames and foundation frames. The bees have a tendency to want to reconnect the brood chamber by filling the frames in between with eggs. David will talk about checkerboarding as a means to prevent the bees from swarming by creating the illusion they have plenty more space in the hive. Join us!

Q?

Monthly General Meeting – Dwight Wells

A.

Forty-Eight Hour Queen Cells
Presented by Dwight Wells

Dwight Wells

This presentation is an overview of the about, why and how of 48 Hour Queen Cells in an innovative process to produce and distribute Honey Bee Genetics Locally. Beekeepers can finish the queen cell production and queen mating in their local drone gene pools with their equipment and resources.

48-hour Queen cell distribution overcomes the problem of one Beekeeper Grafting, cell starting, finishing and mating queens which requires a lot of time, equipment and bee resources.

A bonus can happen if a group of beekeepers develop a network of colonies to provide evaluated/selected breeding stock for the 48 Hour Queen Cell Project.

“Distribution Of improved genetics appears to be the weak link in the chain when it comes to propagating local queens from local stock”.

Dr Joe Latshaw - Bee Culture April 2011

Q?

Invasive Forest Pest Workshop

A.

Invasive pests are attacking our forests. Help PROTECT our trees! Learn how to RECOGNIZE and REPORT invasive pests in a FREE workshop.

Open to the public! Professional development credits also available-CCHs, ISA CEUs, and SAF CFEs.

Registration is REQUIRED but there is NO COST to attend.
Light refreshments provided.
Questions? Contact Elizabeth Barnes using the info below.

Three different dates, three different locations.

May 22nd - Evansville
5:30-8:30 PM CST
Mesker Park Zoo
Carousel Event Room
1545 Mesker Park Drive
Evansville, IN 47720

May 23nd - Clarksville
5:30-8:30 PM EST
Falls of the Ohio
Auditorium
201 W. Riverside Dr.
Clarksville, IN 47129

May 24th - Lawrenceburg
5:30-8:30 PM EST
Dearborn Adult Center
311 W. Tate St.
Lawrenceburg, IN 47025

Download PDF detailed info.

Q?

A Beekeeping Symposium

A.

Caesar Creek State Park’s Visitor’s Center
Sunday, March 4 th , 2018 10am – 4pm

Sponsored by the Southwest Girls Beekeeping Club and Caesar Creek.

This event is free and open to the public. No registration is required.

Morning Session 10:00 - 11:30am

  • “The basics of beekeeping & how to get started” (Suzanne Geisler, Eileen Hahn, Suzy Hardin, & Kendra Sulesky)
  • “How to Build and Repair your own bee hive box” (Sam and Erin Shaw)

Pot Luck Lunch 11:30 – 12:30

Afternoon Session 12:30 – 4:00pm

  • “Year round trees & flowers to plant for bees” (ODNR Naturalist, Erin Shaw)
  • “Swarm Catching” (Jason Smith of Twin Creek Farm & Glen Penquite)
  • “Small Hive Beetle” (State Bee Inspector, Jeff Harris)
  • “Varroa Mite Control” (State Entomologist, Barb Bloetscher)

Kids’ Corner for you little beekeepers with games and learning activities!

A Raffle to benefit the Little Miami River Conservancy Pollinator Project

~ All speakers and vendors are local ~

Hope to see you there!

Have a question? Email [email protected]

Q?

SIBA March 2018 Meeting

A.

The SIBA general meetings are held the third Thursday of each month and start at 6:30pm. The March meeting will be held at the Moores Hill Senior Center. The address is: 16610 N. Broadway Moores Hill In. 47032.

Dave Broxterman and Jason Morgan will demonstrate several methods of making splits for apiary increase and varroa management. We are still meeting at our winter location at the Moores Hill Senior Center, so while an in-hive demonstration is not possible, they'll bring some props to make sure the session is most informative.

Bastin Honey Farm may be here with their trailer if you are needing any bee supplies for the upcoming season!

 

Q?

SIBA February 2018 Meeting

A.

Dwight Wells will visit us again to talk about Swarm traps... and trapping! Always a great topic... and just in time to get things ready to go collect some swarms for the 2018 swarm season!

Dwight started keeping bees in 1954 at age 14 as a Penn State 4H Project. President of West Central Ohio Beekeepers Association (WCOBA), Life Member and a Board Director of Ohio State Beekeepers Association (OSBA), a member of The Beekeepers of Indiana and The Pennsylvania State Beekeepers Association. A founding member of the Heartland Honey Bee Breeders Cooperative (HHBBC). Vice President Buckeye Queen Producers. American Beekeeping Federation Member. His passion is promoting Sustainable Beekeeping, which creates low over-wintering losses, and mentoring and educating beekeepers. He is presently working on several projects, evaluating Purdue Honey Bee Stock, with Penn State on Landscape Analysis and Feral Colony swarm traps. Dwight is also involved in Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) projects.

The SIBA general meetings are held the third Thursday of each month and start at 6:30pm.

The winter meetings (Dec. 2017, and Jan-Mar 2018) will be held at the Moores Hill Senior Center. The address is: 16610 N. Broadway Moores Hill In. 47032.

Q?

12th Annual Food & Growers Association Winter Conference!

A.

Get your tickets to the 12th Annual
Food & Growers Association 
Winter Conference!

Beat the cold weather and spend a great day with farmers and eaters, learning about seed saving, organics, foraging, eating healthy on a budget, soil health, and a lot more!  Tickets are going fast, so be sure to get yours now.  Seating is limited!

For more information on conference speakers and the entire program, see our website at http://foodandgrowers.org/events .

Get your tickets now, seating is limited!  You may purchase tickets, $35 members/$55 member couple or $45 non-member/$75 non-member couple, by going to our Eventbrite page OR send your check payable to FGA to 1032 3 Mile Rd., Batesville, IN  47006 OR register by emailing [email protected].

We will see you there!

Q?

Garry’s Third/Final Winter Workshop

A.

Anyone is welcome. Bring your materials and your safety glasses. Glasses are REQUIRED.

This is the third and final workshop of Garry's three workshops. It's really helpful if you come to the meeting prior to the workshop and tell Garry what you need help making. That way, he can make the proper arrangements and gang people up.

Things to do and make at workshop:

  • Repair any beekeeping equipment
  • Make woodenware (deeps, mediums, swarm traps, lids, bottom boards, etc.)
  • Come to just learn and help. Many people just come to help their first time until they get to know the format on how the workshops go.

They are free and open to anyone coming to the SIBA meetings.

Q?

Garry’s Second Winter Workshop

A.

Anyone is welcome. Bring your materials and your safety glasses. Glasses are REQUIRED.

This is the second of Garry's three winter workshop series. It's really helpful if you come to the meeting prior to the workshop and tell Garry what you need help making. That way, he can make the proper arrangements and gang people up.

Things to do and make at workshop:

  • Repair any beekeeping equipment
  • Make woodenware (deeps, mediums, swarm traps, lids, bottom boards, etc.)
  • Come to just learn and help. Many people just come to help their first time until they get to know the format on how the workshops go.

They are free and open to anyone coming to the SIBA meetings.

Q?

SIBA Monthly Meeting

A.

Karen Ferguson will talk about taking notes and logs for each hive. Paying attention to what's going on in each hive is one thing, writing it down in a way that you can remember it is another. It's so important to know what the state of the hive was the last time you were in it so that you can see marked improvement, or decline at the current inspection. Over time, you will be able to look back in the notes to make more educated decisions.

Karen has provided the following hive log sheet in PDF format in prep for the meeting. If you can, print and bring to the meeting to have something up close while she speaks.

The SIBA general meetings are held the third Thursday of each month and start at 6:30pm.

The winter meetings (Dec. 2017, and Jan-Mar 2018) will be held at the Moores Hill Senior Center. The address is: 16610 N. Broadway Moores Hill In. 47032.

Q?

Indiana Bee School XVI

A.

It is that time again when we all look forward to registering for the Bee School.  With wonderful local and national speakers, super topics, great lunch and hundreds of beekeepers that we haven’t seen since the previous year, we seem to get bigger and better and this year will be no exception.  Once again, we have a first time guest speaker for the Indiana Bee School.  Dr. Jeff Harris is from the Mississippi State University, see "Who is our Guest Speaker" on our Indiana Bee School XVI page for more information.

The new software is now in place for online registration.  You may also register via email, click here to download the registration form and mail in the payment.

You’ll notice on the form this year, we have member and non-member prices.  All events beginning in 2018, (Indiana Bee School, Purdue Field Day and the Fall Conference) will allow members to pay a lower fee.  This was voted and passed by the TBoI board and validated that doing so we’d still be in compliance with our 501(c)(3) status.

Beginning Classes

We have brought back the beginning beekeeping classes.  Each attendee that registers for the beginning beekeeping classes will be in a single classroom all day and will receive a wrist band that is required to be worn to give them access to the classroom.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Garry Reeves will be running the December topic on repairing your equipment. Garry runs the Winter Workshop series each winter... inviting members to his workshop to build new equipment or repair their used equipment. It seemed fitting to ask him to present in December, and since we all should be thinking about how many hives we'd like to have set up in the 2018 season, now is the time to start getting things ready.

Come to the December meeting, and then watch for the next two winter workshop dates! See you there!

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

By way of a unanimous vote at the September meeting, there are enough newer beekeepers that wanted to cover the topic of candy boards for the November meeting.

Jason Morgan will do a hands-on demonstration and make a candy board before your very eyes. Candy boards offer some peace of mind over the winter... especially if you think your hive is really low on honey stores. The benefits of a candy board made correctly adds many benefits to help the bee hive over the winter. The candy board is simply a hardened sugar mixture that lives in a 2-3 inch frame body and has hardware cloth on the bottom to hold the "candy" up. Find out more about candy boards here and watch the video we made previously. We've updated some of our beliefs about candy boards since the video was made... so, join us in November to hear the latest, and ask your questions!

The candy board we make will be raffled off at the end of the meeting. Also, Garry's first Winter workshop will be held the Sat. after the November meeting because December will just be too busy! If you are inspired to make candy boards from the November meeting, then this workshop may be the one to come to and make a few up!

Q?

SIBA Christmas Party

A.

We're looking at Saturday December 9th (the second Saturday in December) for the SIBA Christmas party. Keep an eye out for details, but in the past, we typically start at 6pm and everyone brings a dish, appetizer or dessert to put on the table!

Q?

Garry’s Winter Workshop November

A.

Garry has offered up another winter workshop series. The first one is scheduled for November 18, the Saturday after the November general meeting. This is because December is busy for most of us, and we're looking at December 9th (second Sat. in December) for the SIBA Christmas Party.

If you are inspired to make candy boards after the November meeting, that following Saturday workshop would be a good opportunity to come and make some candy boards. Bring your materials, and your safety glasses and we'll help you from there!

Q?

September FGA Potluck

A.

Just a friendly reminder of the FGA September Potluck.  This is also the annual meeting where they will let you know what they've been up to this year.  Since this is a special potluck, it is important they have your RSVP by September 10th so they can plan on tables and chairs, utensils, drinks and most importantly, our yummy main dish of smoked brisket from BBQ Street.

The potlucks are always free when you bring your dish to share, but if you don't feel like slaving over a stove this month, $5 at the door is much appreciated.

After dinner, which starts at 6:00 promptly, they will have a short presentation on their exciting 2017, and then screen a wonderful movie that has received rave reviews at the Vancouver International Film Festival, titled To Make a Farm.

Hope to see you at Romweber Marketplace in the party area for this special potluck. Please download the picture for more information and please reply to [email protected] with your RSVP by September 10th.

View the FGA website at:  www.foodandgrowers.org

Q?

Beekeeper’s Swapmeet & Pot Luck Picnic

A.

Bring a covered dish to share at the Beekeeper's Swapmeet and join us for lunch from Noon to 1:00 before the swap meet WCBA will provide fried chicken, water, plates, napkins, plastic ware. Bring your beekeeping items and bee-friendly plants for sale or trade. Bees and used equipment must be certified by the Warren County Bee Inspector. If ya’ got nuttin’ t’ swap, come anyway! park opens at 11:00AM & closes at dusk

RSVP before September 1st, by e-mail, to [email protected] with number of folks attending, your side dish for lunch, and what you have to swap or are looking for. If you do not receive an acknowledgment by e-mail, we did not get your information. Will publish an e-mail of planned items available for sale or trade. See you there!

GPS  N39d 27.491'   W84d 16.762'

View the PDF: BEEKEEPERS_SWAPMEET_2017

 

Q?

SIBA Beekeepers Picnic

A.

This year, Mike Bentz will host the SIBA picnic in Brookville. Cider making will start at 7am. People can bring their own, cleaned/washed apples to press if they choose. He'll have 15-20 bushels of his own to run through the press. Come watch, partake, and enjoy some fresh cider.

We eat at noon. Menu: Fried Chicken and potatoes. Bring a side dish to share! Bring a cooler with ice to keep your cider cold on the way home if you bring your own apples. Bring your own chairs too.

Bring your veils. After lunch, we'll do hive inspections and then Mike will do a garden tour. If enough interest, we can visit his farm 7 minutes from his house in Blooming Grove for more bee stuff.

8122 Garr Hill Rd Brookville In 47012.  Go north on 101 approximately 4 miles turn left on Garr Hill road towards the lake. Red brick house on left. Park on road and walk up concrete driveway.

Q?

Aurora Farmers Fair – SIBA Booth!

A.

SIBA will be manning a double booth at the Aurora Farmers Fair. We need your help! Find out more here, and let us know how you can help!

Q?

Weed Walk with Chandra Mattingly

A.

Want to learn more about the forage your honey bees work on to bring on all that honey and nectar? Join Chandra Mattingly at Deb's Grass Roots (Lake Tambo Rd. in Sunman) to take a closer look at the weeds that are in season now.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

The monthly general SIBA meeting occurs the third Thursday of each month.

---

We have a special treat for all of you this month. We've assembled an elite group of SIBA members to talk about pests and diseases. These members all keep bees within a 50 mile radius of Garry's Workshop so the pests and diseases discussed should be very relevant to all of us!

Andy Wigam and Karen Ferguson will start the meeting in Garry's apiary with an alcohol wash on a bee hive. This is probably the most important tool in the beekeepers toolbox. You need to have a wash kit, and an understanding on how to use it to monitor the mite loads in your beehive. Only when the beekeeper is aware, can they do something about the mites. Bring your veils and be on time! We'll start in the hive promptly at 6:30pm.

Once done, we'll move inside where Jim Orem will follow with announcements and other annoying club business.

Brian Wingerberg will then take over talking about mites. He'll turn it over to Garry Reeves and Jason Morgan to give an update on the OA shop towels and other pertinent information about options for dealing with mites.

Dave Rieman will follow up about hive beetles (SHB) and wax moth. Dave will hand things off to Dave Broxterman who will cover nosema and fowl brood. He'll also be our clean-up hitter to cover alternate pests or disease. We hope this will turn in to a club discussion and members are free to chime in!

We at SIBA believe that mites are our biggest problem as far as pests and diseases go. Mites are the invisible enemy when you are not looking. They are responsible for mid-season, late-season and spring warm-up deadouts. It's just that simple. If your colony has a mite load that is over the threshhold, then they are already getting sick with viruses. Being proactive on identifying mites at lower levels will allow you to make the decisions you need to reduce those numbers, and maintain more healthy hives. When hives have low mites, it's amazing how most other things just take care of themselves.

Hope to see you at Garry's Workshop on Thursday, July 15 at 6:30pm!

Q?

Heartland Apicultural Society

A.

HAS returns to Indiana with the 2017 meeting at the University of Southern Indiana in Evansville

See the website for details

 

Q?

Wildlife Pollinator Field Day

A.

June 24th - 9am to 3pm
Something For Everyone!

FORESTRY - POLLINATORS - INVASIVE MANAGEMENT - WARM SEASON GRASS - ESTABLISHMENT - POND MANAGEMENT

ECHO HILL FARMS - OFF LAKE TAMBO RD
13133 Ridge Dr., Sunman, IN 47041

9:00—9:45am
VICKIE SMITH, SWCD—”Introductions”
ECHO HILL FARMS—”Conservation Practices Implemented”
MATT JARVIS, NRCS—”USDA Programs Available”

9:45—10:30am
JIM OREM—SOUTHEAST INDIANA BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION “Identifying Pollinators For Honey Bees”

NATHAN YAZEL, IDNR DISTRICT WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST “Planting & Managing Wildlife/Pollinator Practices”

10:45—11:45am
ROBERT McGRIFF, IDNR DISTRICT FORESTER
“Identifying Trees”/”Forest Stand Improvement”
“Identifying Invasive Plants & Management”

12:00—1:00pm
BOX LUNCH PROVIDED—NO CHARGE

1:00—1:45pm
JIM OREM—SOUTHEAST INDIANA BEEKEEPERS ASSOCIATION “Beginning Beekeeping”

1:45—3:00pm
JOEY LEACH/TIM HOLT, AQUATIC BIOLOGISTS AQUATIC CONTROL COMPANY—“Pond Management”/”Weed ID”/ ”Treatment”/“Aeration Systems”/”Fish Stocking & Management”/ “Will be bringing “Shocker Boat” to demonstrate Electrofishing”

BE SURE TO BRING YOUR LAWN CHAIR - BRING AQUATIC PLANTS FOR ID & TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS

RESERVATIONS NEEDED BY JUNE 16TH
CALL….. DEARBORN COUNTY SWCD—812-926-2406 EXT 3

USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer

View the complete invite in PDF by clicking here.

Q?

Laughery Valley Fish And Game Club

A.

Habitat meeting hosted by LVF&G club July 13, 2017 at 7:00 pm.
The IDNR District wildlife biologist, NRCS District soil conservationist and the Ripley county soil conservation district will be put on a program on habitat for wildlife of all types including honey bees, deer ,turkeys, quail and any other wild species in our area. They will also tell what programs are available to help fund the installation of the habitat plot. This includes cost share info from the USDA and the IDNR.

Q?

Purdue Bee Lab

A.

Registration required. Find more details here.

Q?

Learn to do a cut-out with John Lewis

A.

On Saturday May 20th, 9:00am, John Lewis and Jason Morgan will be demonstrating how to cut bees out of a ceiling. This workshop will compliment the May SIBA meeting on Thurs. May 18 where Mike Bentz will explain the process, approach and and talk about some of the tools needed. Join us at Les Johnson's historic house in Aurora, IN. at 9:00am. Bring your veil and protective clothing. Remember, shaking bees out of trees is different then cutting them out of a wall or ceiling.

Take Rt 56 out of Aurora, and turn right on to Hartford Pike, then a quick right on Old SR 56. You'll see the house on the left up on the hill.

More details at the SIBA meeting on Thursday.

Q?

Chan’s Plant Sale

A.

109 N. High Street (Rt 56) Rising Sun, IN - Herbs, Perennials, Wildflowers and More. 11, 12, 13 and 20th

View brochure for more details

Q?

Chan’s Plant Sale

A.

109 N. High Street (Rt 56) Rising Sun, IN - Herbs, Perennials, Wildflowers and More. 11, 12, 13 and 20th

View brochure for more details

Q?

Bedford Bee Intensive Field Day

A.

A hands on field day event with live hive inspections. It is designed for beekeepers with at least one year of beekeeping experience. Guests with less experience are encouraged to attend the beginning beekeepers class.

There will be a Beginning Beekeeper class

Bring your own protective clothing. Live Bees on site to work with.

  • Making Increase and Splits
  • Problems of the Hive(laying workers, bad queens, Small Hive Beetle, Dearth,Wax Moth, Mites
  • Treatment of Bees For Mites Using Oxalic Acid
  • Round table discussion
  • Hive inspection
  • Soaps, Lip Balm, Wax usage
  • Honey Judging, Honey tasting using Honey tasting guide of U.S.
  • Mead Making
  • Wood ware and hive types
  • Nosema Testing-Microscope usage.
  • Honey Tasting
  • Several other classes in the planning stages

All information can be found on the Bedford website as well as the registration information. Lunch is provided with your registration. Pre-registration is required.

Other vendors will be there selling equipment and supplies.

Q?

SIBA at Indiana State Fair

A.

SIBA will be manning the booth at the Indiana State Fair. We'll have an observation hive, and will run two presentations that day. We need volunteers. This is easy work... getting you free admission, and an air-conditioned space to sell honey, ice-cream, and other products. Don't be shy! We have new people each year at this... You're given directions at the beginning of your shift, and everyone always has a great time.

Who can help? Email John Miller.

 

Q?

In the Apiary with Mel Disselkoen

A.

Mel Disselkoen will be joining us at Garry Reeves apiary for a Saturday field-day. Mel strives to identify the natural behaviors and seasonal reproductive cycles of the honeybee and then direct those behaviors toward a profitable objective.

"Since honeybee behavior is naturally directed towards survival and increase, beekeepers can adapt their management and business models to the honeybee's natural instincts so that stress is minimized and performance is optimized. By working within this philosophy of cooperating with nature, I have found that the best bee is the bee that can overwinter in your area."

-Mel Disselkoen

History

Mel Disselkoen was born on a farm in a Dutch settlement in South Dakota. He grew up with an independent farming mentality of hard work and creative problem solving. He has kept bees for over 40 years and is familiar with all facets of beekeeping. Today Mel enjoys observing honeybee behavior and teaching beekeepers how to use his OTS queen rearing method to self-sufficiently reach their objectives.

We hope you'll join us as the field days we've had in the past with Mel were very informative.

Q?

Conservation Happenings in Southern Indiana

A.

Attention all who are interested in Southern Indiana Conservation You are invited to a Meeting to create a dialogue about landscape level conservation and strategic habitat conservation at Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge Tuesday March 14, 2017 9 AM - 3 PM. Last year we had 116 enthusiastic conservation minded people attend and we are working on another excellent line up of speakers and topics for this years meeting.  Please forward this to everyone and anyone who you feel may be interested in attending.
We have another great line up of speakers for this year.

See the agenda and detailed info here

GOALS

  • To facilitate a meeting to create an opportunity to keep the conservation community connected, increase dialogue about landscape level conservation and all the things happening for conservation in southern Indiana
  • To expand the audience to work with partners, stakeholders, and landowners while increasing awareness of landscape and watershed conservation issues, opportunities, and benefits through environmental education, outreach, and technical assistance.

Q?

Introductory Beekeeping Course

A.

So you want to be a Beekeeper?

3-part series: Thursdays, February 16, February 23, and March 2nd, 6:00-8:00 pm
Instructors: Randy Morgan, Emeritus Curator-Insectarium, Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden; Phil Hucke, Certified Arborist, Ray Babcock, President- Southwestern Ohio Beekeepers Association

*All together over 55 years of beekeeping experience!
Cost: $45 for series (must register for entire series)

The amazing honey bee is an agriculturally-important pollinator threatened by many human activities. Beekeeping, the art and science of managing honey bees, is a fascinating hobby, fun backyard business and extensive agro-industry. This introductory course is intended to encourage and support interested non-beekeepers. Novice beekeepers are also welcome! Sign up now to learn about and experience the joy of beekeeping! This program will answer your questions about: Getting started, use of and ordering equipment, costs, where to place your bees, how to get your bees, protective clothing, etc.

The official announcement

Click here to register

Q?

Garry’s Winter Workshop – Feb 2017

A.

The final winter workshop for the season is locked in for Sat. February 18th 2017. Bring your materials, safety glasses, and be ready to build!

Now is the time to fix old equipment or build frames, boxes, and other woodenware. Check out the popular swarm trap blog freshly updated with plans to build two swarm traps from a 4x8 sheet of plywood. If you want to come and watch or jump into an assembly line to learn as we go, come on over! See you there.

DON'T FORGET YOUR SAFETY GLASSES!

Q?

Food and Growers Association Winter Conference 2017

A.

"Local Food: A 'Growing' Revolution"

When:  Saturday, February 4th, 9AM - 3:15PM
Where: Batesville Middle School

Again this year, we will be hosting two educational tracks: one for producers/growers and another for consumers and home gardeners. As always, you are invited to attend talks in either track! Topics include:

  • Closed-loop farming
  • Small farm profitability
  • Season extension using high and low tunnels
  • Q&A with a panel of experienced farmers
  • Fermentation
  • Canning
  • Cheesemaking
  • Medicinal mushrooms and wild edible foraging

View website to see all tracks and all the speakers and sessions.

Lunch will be provided as a "Taste of Southeast Indiana" from area restaurants paired with our local farmers!

New this year, a children's program for ages 3-10 will be available to the children of conference attendees. It will include lunch and lessons about farming and local food!

Invite your friends along to check out our winter market vendor area, featuring locally produced foods and other items, as well as informational booths from area organizations. The vendor area will be free and open to the public from 9-11am.If you are interested in becoming a vendor , email us at [email protected].

Registration is open now, and tickets are limited! Sign up through our Eventbrite page!

Q?

Indiana Bee School XV

A.

The Beekeepers of Indiana will hold its fifteenth Bee School in Indianapolis, Indiana on Saturday February 25, 2017, at Decatur Central High School, 5251 Kentucky Avenue, Indianapolis, Indiana 46221. Here are the Directions to the school and hotels. Folder pickup starts at 7:00 a.m. (EST), with the program starting promptly at 8:30 a.m. and concluding at 5:00 p.m.

We are honored to have reached this significant milestone as well as having Susan Cobey as our keynote speaker. Susan has taught the specialized technique of instrumental insemination for more than three decades. This is the first year that Sue has been a keynote speaker in Indiana and we are very excited to have her here. For a tentative agenda, click here.

Lectures, hands-on workshops and discussions will be held for beekeepers with any level of skill, experience or ability. Topics on introductory beekeeping tools and techniques, as well as learning opportunities for the more advanced beekeeper will be available. Along with a great program have a raffle, an auction and a variety of vendor displays and supplies from several of the top vendors such as Blue Sky, Dadant, Mann Lake and others. See list of vendors below.

Online registrations will include an additional transaction fee. Registrations that include a legible email will be sent an email confirmation. Be sure to register early, once we are full, we are full.

We’ve made some changes to the registration for the bee school so please read carefully. We no longer have family registration, each person will need to register. We have a discounted rate for children under 15 accompanied by an adult.

Beginning beekeeping classes are also a new concept at this year’s bee school. Each attendee that registers for the beginning beekeeping classes will receive a wrist band that will need to be worn to give them access to the classes. These classes are for those that have little to no experience in beekeeping.

Q?

Free Bedford Beekeeping School

A.

 

Have you ever been interested in keeping honey bees? Bedford Beekeepers Bee Club will be having a free class on bee keeping This class is for beginners and for all that want to refresh, and learn what is new in beekeeping.

Our annual Beginning Beekeeper Class is a one-day event that takes place in January and serves as an introduction to the basics of beekeeping. Participants will learn about the history and life cycle of honey bees, types of bee hives, various beekeeping equipment, and common diseases.

This class is FREE and includes a silent auction, which is part of our annual fundraising efforts. Class will be at Central Church of Christ Ed building 1401 12th street in Bedford.

A BEEHIVE AND BEES will be the door prize at the end of day.

Saturday January 28, 2017 9am- 4pm

Auction at noon. Many bee related Items. Orders will be taken for Packages of bees.

YOU MUST RSVP. Use the info below.

Our Club is free to join and has no dues. Just come learn and help the bees and enjoy.

Q?

Garry’s 2017 Winter Workshop #2

A.

The second winter workshop is locked in for Sat. January 14th 2017. Bring your materials, safety glasses, and be ready to build!

Now is the time to fix old equipment or build frames, boxes, and other woodenware. Check out the popular swarm trap blog freshly updated with plans to build two swarm traps from a 4x8 sheet of plywood. If you want to come and watch or jump into an assembly line to learn as we go, come on over! See you there.

DON'T FORGET YOUR SAFETY GLASSES!

 

Q?

I have installed 3 very full 5-frame nucs in 10 frame boxes with 5 frames of foundation in each hive. What is a reasonable estimate of how long it would take them to build out 5 frames?

A.

It will depend on the forage available in your area as well as the nectar that is flowing. Keep in mind that it's not the pollen they use for drawing comb, it's nectar! Lot's of pollen is a good thing, as the queen needs it for egg-laying, and they'll also use it for proper nutrition. A good array of pollen is good too. Different colors suggest a well-balanced diet. If you are not opposed to sugar feeding, now is the time. When you sugar feed, you simulate a honey flow and they can use that to draw out comb until the first honey flow in your area. Some people believe sugar is harmful for the bees gut over the long term, and I believe there's a lot of truth in that. I still tend to feed starting colonies. You have to decide what's best, but if you are not opposed, put on the 1:1 sugar water to help them draw the comb and build them up. In a good scenario, they could draw 5 frames in 1-2 weeks, but the ebb and flow of resources will determine it. When your boxes have about 1-8 drawn frames, it's time to add a box. If you will be adding a second deep, I like to 'checker-board', that is pull a couple frames of bees up in to that box and stick the foundation frames below in the bottom box. They tend to want to connect the brood chamber. But don't do this yet if you still expect some cold nights. This is a manipulation you want to do when you know the warmer temps are here to stay.

Q?

On the queen calendar it says on day 10, 11 and 12 you should not move a queen cell because it will damage it at a critical time. If you find a QC in your hive how do you know if it is at one of those days or is it safe to move it?

A.

I'm no expert on queen grafting, but I'm thinking that the process of manipulating eggs and cells suggests leaving things be during a certain time while you are waiting to see if your grafts work. In the regular process of seeing a queen cell in your hive, it should be safe to move it to a nuc or handle it to get it to its final destination. I have to admit that I have always done this when I needed to with no regard to what stage the cell is in. I have had no problems. However, consider all queen cells fragile. Move it slow and try not to bump it around and be extra careful when sliding your frame back in making sure not to smash it on another frame. Make sure to bring some resources over with the frame with the cell on it. If you can spare, bring a frame over with some capped brood and have some honey and pollen in there with it.

Q?

Reverse or not to reverse hive bodies in the Spring? If so, how do you determine when?

A.

Here's the practices that are taught in our club... first, wait for the right day. The spring manipulation is a significant one. It entails breaking the boxes down to the bottom board and scraping out the dead bees. The temperature needs to be comfortable to stand in with a long sleeve shirt and ideally, warmer weather to follow. You will be breaking any cluster with your manipulation so don't be too hasty. We never just do a blind hive body reverse. What if the cluster is straddling the lower and upper boxes? In the case of reversing, you would effectively be breaking the brood chamber and cluster in two and separating them far from each other. Rather after cleaning the bottom board, we'll take a new empty body and set it on the bottom board, then go frame by frame putting the egg frames in the center on the bottom, and making sure to put some pollen and honey on either side of the cluster. Then, put honey and pollen in the frames above them in the top box. The really positions them to move up and take over the second deep later.

Q?

It’s the middle of winter and I want to move my hives. Can I do that?

A.

It should be OK to relocate your hives before spring, but I would do it when we're expecting some warmer temps. Moving them would likely shake up the cluster and if you are heading back in to a chilly night, that may be bad news.

Q?

My two hives seem to have low resources. Now the temperatures are cold, so I cannot open the hives. What can I do? 

A.

You could make up some candy board right now and on a decent day, suit up and be quick about it. Just take off the top and inner cover and slip the board on top, then put back on your inner cover and out cover. It's never too late to do this if you suspect there is not enough honey in the hive. The candy board offers additional benefits of absorbing moisture as well.

Q?

Do mites have an impact on colony collapse disorder?

A.

This is a broad topic and it is still a mystery in many regards. However, it's believed that the presence of mites play a role in many problems within a hive as well as CCD. Systemic pesticides and herbicides on the plants that bees land on also play a role. Bees can also get sick just like humans. Bees do not defecate in their hive. The wait until they go outside. If it's too cold to go outside, they will hold it until temps get back up. When we have long, cold spells (for weeks at a time) the bees cannot get outside and so they get a form of dysentery called "Nosema." When we see bees with deformed wings, we refer to it as deformed-wing virus... a virus believed to be caused by mite infestations. Recent research has suggested that when bees have both the sickness and the disease, they are doomed. It causes a psychological issue in their navigation and in many cases, the bees can't find their way back to the hive. The signs of CCD are empty hives and not many dead bees to be found. It's quite sad. I am by no means a researcher, but these are my gleanings as I speak to others and work in my own hives. The issue of CCD is an issue that everyone will need to play a role in. Even non-beekeepers can do things to be more bee-friendly, like using organic solutions in their gardens and lawns... and planting more bee-friendly forage. Honey bees are gentle, delicate creatures of the planet who are being impacted in a huge way by the practices of human beings. No one has been able to unlock the exact issues that are contributing to the decline in our bees. And, unfortunately, many will never understand the impact until it is too late. We require pollination in everything we depend on. There is an area in China where honey bees are now extinct and then have to specifically hand-pollinate their spring blossoms using a feather with pollen on it. Hundreds of workers will get up on ladders and hand pollinate the blossom on a fruit tree or another plant that needs pollination. It is literally a race to find the cause and solution for CCD.

Q?

How often do you sugar dust your hive?

A.

One treatment consists of three individual dustings 1 week apart. Again, it's important to be thorough on each treatment. It does take effort an time to do it, hence the reason we are always looking at alternative natural methods to hinder mites. In our club, we have decided that sugar dusting a bee hive is futile.

Q?

Can you please explain the process and results of sugar dusting?

A.

The process entails coating the bees with an even dusting of powdered (confectioners) sugar. As I mentioned above, the mites hold on using suction cup feet. When you dust, and the mites are knocked off the bees (or they loose grip because their suction cup feet get clogged) and they fall to the bottom. I use a "screen-bottom" on my hive so that the mites fall through and out of the hive. Many beekeepers use solid wood for bottom boards (traditionally) and so if any mites were to fall on those floors, they can easily climb back on to bees coming back in to the front entrance of the hive. The mite effectively hitches a ride back up in to the hive. So, it's important use a screened bottom in conjunction with sugar dusting so that any falling mites fall out of the hive. In terms of the process, many sugar-dusters just sprinkle a think layer of sugar on to the top of the frames and use a bee brush to brush it down between the frames, therefore dropping the sugar on the bees clinging to the sides. However, this does not coat any bees that are hanging on the underside of the frames. I myself prefer to take out each frame one at a time and I use a special pair of bellows that blows a light coating across the backs of all the bees. It's easier when you have a helping hand to hold the frame while the other person operates the bellows. It's also important to follow up with at least 2 subsequent dustings for one full treatment. Remember, while the live mites on the bees will fall off, there are many other mites still sealed in the comb with larva that will emerge when the bee emerges. So it's necessary to do at least three dustings 1-2 weeks apart to get these mites as well. Last, it's important not to coat the powdered sugar on to the bees any thicker then necessary. Too thick, and it can suffocate the bee. It has several glands on its underside that it uses to breath. Clogging these can kill the bee. Only a light dusting is necessary. To measure your success, we place what's called a "sticky board" under the screen on the bottom to catch any mites that fall out. We can count these mites and determine if there is a serious infestation or if further action is needed. Every beekeeper has his/her own threshold of what's considered an infestation. I look at my board after 24 hours and see how many mites are on it. Then, I clean it off and check again in another 24 hours. Typically, you see new mites dropping and the number decreases each time you check. As I mentioned, following up with subsequent treatments is a good idea so that you really put a dent in the mite infestation. One treatment consists of three individual dustings 1-2 weeks apart.

Q?

We are new to beekeeping and need to buy protective clothing. There are so may different styles I don’t even know where to start

A.

Most beekeepers will always wear a veil. The face is a sensitive area where if you get stung, it swells more so than other areas. Everyone will be unique in this regard. You will find that the bees are more gentle than typically perceived. Still, it's wise to be cautious as you get the feel for your bees. I went out and bought the lightweight, Tyvek suits. These are really cheap. I've seen them in packs for under $10. You can find them on eBay as well. It's a full-body, zippered disposable suit. However, you can re-use them.

Until you are sure you want full protective clothing, I would experiment. There are a lot of styles, but I find that a veil, with a long-sleeve shirt and jeans are just as good. You definitely want gloves for when you harvest. I usually don't wear gloves except when I'm robbing the bees of their honey!

There are people in our group that are allergic to bees, so they bundle up. Other, like myself wear only a veil and whatever we have on at the time. Feel free to come to a meeting and talk with others. Everyone has a different take on this and perhaps you can find some answers and comfort as you prepare for your new venture. I'm sure you'll have a blast. Take care.

Q?

What size hardware cloth do you recommend for making the candy boards? 

A.

As far as the cloth size... I used 1/4" last year with no issue. This year, I went to 3/8" just because I had it laying around. Don't go any smaller than 1/4" though or they can't get through. I've not heard of any issues with galvanized metal being bad for bees.

Q?

Mel Disselkoen spoke about “notching” some cell walls of 36 hour larva. Could you explain the why and how about notching? A demonstration would be helpful

A.

"Notching" is what he does with the hive tool to stimulate the bees to start the queen raising in those specific cells. He breaks down the bottom third of the cell wall and bends that cell down about a half inch and down to the "midrib" or middle of the drawn comb. Imagine the midrib being the original foundation. So, you are breaking the comb down to that being careful to leave the larva undisturbed.

As you mentioned, we are looking for 36 hour (or 2-3 days old) larva to notch. Recall he said the bees will take this younger larva to rear a queen with before they choose older larva. They will use older larva if that is all they have, but an egg would be better. So notching the younger, 35 hour larva or eggs is better then trying on older larva. You might make several notches.

Also consider ho may nucs you may try to break out. If you wanted two, you might make notches on two frames... so that when the cells are built, you can take each frame to its new destination.

There are photos on his web site at www.mdasplitter.com

Q?

I purchased a deep super FULL of wax moths. I’ve cleaned it as best I can, and still notice small larvae crawling on it. How do I get rid of them? 

A.

I'm providing this response in collaboration with Jimmy O. This year, I manipulated my hives in a manner that would draw me a lot of comb so that come spring, I have several mediums of drawn comb ready to just drop on top of the hives.

So, how do I protect them now?

Over the last couple weeks, (it's October 18,) the cluster, and brood has been shrinking... I've been pulling frames off. It's a good time to cull out those exceptionally nasty frames. Err on the side of caution. Black comb should be pulled. You can do it in the spring too, but why have potentially ugly frames stewing in the hive all winter? In my case, whole boxes can came off a and I see wax moth larva found their way in to vacant areas of the comb. I pulled these frames, put them in a trash bag and put them in the freezer. Two or more days will do it. Then, pull them out and there are several ways you can go.

If you have freezer space, you can keep frames in the freezer. They do become brittle until completely thawed out.

Jimmy O says the comb should be cut out and burned, but you can be the judge of your infestation and destroy... or try freezing. Scrape the inside of the box and scrape off the frames. You can wash the deep and frames with Clorox water. Some beekeepers use a propane torch to scorch the inside of the box and frames to prevent disease.

Wax moths hate light and fresh air. Jim's unused frames of drawn comb are placed on a rack instead of leaving them in a deep. They are in a shed outside so they will freeze over winter.

I'm trying the para moth crystals from Kelley's in some of mine... and leaving some we'll ventilated in my shed (it'll be cold for many spells in there) over the winter for my own experimentation. Hope this helps.

Q?

How does everyone store their frames with empty comb over the winter?

A.

Currently, I air out the mediums all fall and allow the cold weather to kill off any live wax moth larva. Then I put the supers on in the early spring after scraping the boxes and frames, at the first dandelion bloom before the wax moth becomes active. Then the bees keep them out again till fall.

Wax moths like comb that has had brood raised in it or dark comb more than the light comb that has only had honey in it. They also don't like light so if you can put the frames in a rack that allows light and air to pass through it may even be better.

Q?

I have to move my hive so work can be done behind it. How far can I move it? Can the location be changed without disorienting the bees?

A.

Moving a hive depends on the work, and the workers. Moving hives should be done after dark with all holes screened or blocked, hive stapled together, and strapped tight for safety.

  • They can be moved miles to a friends' location for a few days then back to the new location in the yard.
  • Hives can also be moved a couple feet every day until they are in their new position.

Once your work is done, you can repeat the process and move them back to your yard. Wagons can be used for small hives. Jim orem built a sled for moving his around.

Q?

I made some nucs using queen cells. Once the queens have emerged how long should I keep them in the nuc boxes?

A.

You will get a different answer here depending on who you ask, but I would leave them alone and make the decision to move it into a hive body when you see they are needing more space. Since the colony is still getting established, it is better to leave them alone for now. I myself have even added a second nuc body on top of the current nuc to give them an "upstairs" to work with. Still the decision can be yours. Just make sure they have enough room between empty drawn comb and foundation. Then, you can ease them into a hive body when your time allows.

Q?

I got my bees in April and I have not been able to find the queen. Should I expect to see a growth in the hive already?

A.

Absolutely, you should see growth. Particularly, you want to find eggs during your hive inspections. It's not necessarily important to find or see the queen as sometimes, it's difficult. However, if you find eggs, then you know there's been a queen in there in the last 24 hours. Eggs don't stay eggs very long before they begin to form into larva. The bees can and will raise a new queen on their own but they need to have a fertilized egg to start with. If you can't find ANY eggs, then the best thing you could do is see if there's a friend or club member that would consider giving you a frame with eggs/brood to place in your hive. The bees can use one of those eggs to rear a new queen. Or... even better, perhaps they would have a frame with a still-capped supercedure queen cell on it. You can slide this frame into your hive and when she emerges, the bees usually accept the queen.

Again, you want to see eggs with each hive inspection. This assures you there's a laying queen and the hive, for the most part, will take care of itself from there.

Q?

How high off the ground should I place my bee hive?

A.

What works best for you? The beekeeper will typically place their hive near the ground. Many have said that bees prefer heights and that may be so, but think about it... bees live perfectly happy in a apiary where all the boxes are lower to the ground. Since you will be working in your hive, it makes sense to keep them at a distance closer to the ground so that as you add supers, the hive is still manageable without a step or ladder. Remember, those deep supers, when full of honey are approaching 100 lbs!

You can use a palette, some C-type cinder blocks or even a home made hive stand. Just be sure that it's placed in a manner that considers all weather. With a heavy hive, if you have it on a stand, you would not want it to sink into the soft ground and tip over!

Q?

I lost a swarm after right after I captured it. What happened?

A.

It sounds like they had a home picked out already or were missing a queen. We've lost a couple swarms that the bees ALL went in the box then decided to run away later. Old comb helps, swarm lure helps getting most of the bees at the entrance helps, honey in the hive helps.

We had a swarm on a fire hydrant. we put a sheet under them on the ground and set the box in front and just before we swept them onto the sheet they all flew off! right over a school building and on a tree limb. we cut the limb and placed it in front of the hive and they all ran in. Sometimes we can't make them fall off a tree. They were in the middle of a weeping cherry tree and would fly back to the middle of the tree no matter how hard we hit the tree. We set the hive on a ladder as close to the swarm as we could get it and they all ran in! I have quite a bit of swarm catching experience and sometimes we just cant get them to stay in the box. That is one of the reasons it is so exciting.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

We welcome back Tyson Hermes for the January meeting. Tyson will demonstrate his process beeswax candlemaking. It will include the basics, supplies, his process, and clean-up.

Tyson did this about 3 year ago and it was quite a popular event. We have a video on the website here.

View Tyson's slide deck from the 1/17/17 SIBA Meeting in Moores Hill.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Jim Orem will lead a discussion on homemade/build-it-yourself bee tools or equipment. We did one of these during the winter a few years back and many brought in tools and ideas of their own to share. You are encouraged to bring whatever you have made as well! We've seen bee vacs, hive tools and other interesting contraptions that show beekeepers really are thinking of multi-pronged approaches to beekeeping.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Dave Broxterman and Jason Morgan will demonstrate several methods of making splits at the March 2017 SIBA meeting. We are still meeting at our winter location at the Moores Hill Senior Center, so an in-hive demonstration is not likely. Depending on interest, Garry offered up a hive in his apiary the following Sat. to do some real splits. Be sure to tell us if you are interested before or during the March meeting.

Bastin Honey Farm should also be there again with their trailer if you are needing any bee supplies.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Our goal for the May cut-out topic and workshop is to show what is involved to get more beekeepers capable of doing cut-outs. The need is high and there are not enough beekeepers who do cut-outs to help us deal with the influx of calls we get from homeowners, and local authorities each year.

Mike Bentz will lead the discussion, show some techniques, and talk about the typical equipment used. Bring your questions!

On Saturday May 20th, join us at Les Johnson's historic house in Aurora, IN while John Lewis and Jason Morgan demonstrate how to cut bees out of a ceiling. This workshop will compliment the Thursday May 18 SIBA meeting.

Take Rt 56 out of Aurora, and turn right on to Hartford Pike, then a quick right on Old SR 56. You'll see the house on the left up on the hill.

Make sure you bring your veil, gloves and any other protective gear. You are free to observe and ask questions... or even participate!

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Debbie Seib will visit in June and she's talking nucs. Nucs are a great tool for the beekeeper. We'll be discussing what to do with the nucs you've started and answering questions you might have after starting a nuc.

So you have an emergency nuc. How do you maintain it so it doesn't swarm too?

She may also update us on the State Fair, the Heartland Apicultural Society (HAS) and other state and local events.

JUNE RAFFLE! We have quite a raffle happening at the June meeting. Jeff Montag has donated a nuc of bees valued at $175. We also have a FULL Langstroth hive with supers and frames. There is also a plethora of other equipment and tools. $5 for one chance, $10 for 3 chances. See you there, and good luck!

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Join us at Garry's workshop for the August meeting where we'll have two presentations.

Gary Mullen will bring a solar wax melter and tell us about this important beekeeping tool.

Also, Simon Kuntz from The Bee Corp will share his hive monitoring product "Queen's Guard." A pretty cool story out of IU, three students, Ellie Symes, Simon Kuntz and Wyatt Wells co-founded the company that produces a system that will accurately monitor your hive for queenlessness.

After working one summer as an apprentice to an Ohio beekeeper, CEO Ellie Symes returned to campus with a vision. To kick off her sophomore year at Indiana University, Ellie applied for a grant from the Hutton Honors College to help fund the first student-run beehives at IU.

Download the brochure to learn more about the product, and how it works.

Visit the Bee Corp website at www.thebeecorp.com to learn more.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

Arrive an hour early this meeting, 5:30pm! We'll be running mite washes in several hives. We'll have 2 or 3 mite "teams" each with a knowledgable mite-washing leader demonstrating how to do it. Those interested in coming to watch, and/or participate are encouraged to come. Bring your veils and any other protective gear that you use. Full instruction will be provided. See you there...

Kathleen Prough, the Indiana state apiarist will handle the topic this month. She'll be talking about on how and when a beekeeper will need to get a prescription from a veterinarian for Terramycin. She'll also cover EFB, AFB and Parasitic mite syndrome and using Terramycin for these.

If you are an Indiana Beekeeper, you should know Kathleen Prough. She is your state apiarist providing a wealth of information. We always appreciate Kathleen coming down between her busy schedule!

Kathleen M. Prough
Chief Apiary Inspector
IDNR, Div. of Entomology & Plant Pathology
402 W. Washington St., Rm W290
Indianapolis, IN  46204
Work: 317-232-4123
[email protected]

Q?

A Very Bee Night with Author & Kentucky State Apiarist Tammy Horn

A.

The event is $5 and you can register here.

Tammy Horn grew up on a farm, but was determined never to do science, agriculture or math when she went to college. An English professor by training, Horn decided to help her grandfather with his bees in 1997 and immediately became smitten with them. Balancing her career as an English professor and hobbyist, Horn wrote Bees in America: How the Honey Bee Shaped a Nation in 2005 followed by Beeconomy: What Women and Bees teach us about Local Trade and Global Markets in 2012. In order to write it, she went to Hawai’i during off-seasons from 2006-2010 to work in the queen bee production industry.

As the 2006 National Endowment of Humanities Chair of Appalachian Studies at Berea College, Horn focused on large scale surface mining reclamation and specifically how it affected pollinators. From 2007-2014, with a generous grant from Ed and Elaine Holcombe, she started Coal Country Beeworks (based at Eastern Kentucky University), which worked with community partners to offer workshops, education, and practical beekeeping skills in Eastern KY. In addition to working with coal companies to get more pollinator habitat included in reclamation, the KY State legislature approved legislation that would let coal companies modify their reclamation with pollinator habitat and that allowed the Department of Transportation to include more habitat on highway rights-of-way.

In 2014, Horn became the KY State Apiarist. Her primary goals as apiarist are to document hive health, promote economic development, and provide education and outreach. To date, she has partnered on a USDA grant to promote pollinator and cerulean habitat in Eastern KY, a USDA-APHIS Honey Bee Health Survey grant, and implemented a Hive Count/Honey Report system for the state. Horn has served as president for KY State Beekeepers Association, president of Eastern Apiculture Society, a director on Foundation for the Preservation of Honey Bees, and been awarded the 2010 North American Pollinator Protection Advocate Award as well as the Kentucky State Beekeeping Association Lifetime Achievement Award and KSBA Beekeeper of the Year.

Q?

How big should the opening on a swarm trap be, and does it need a vent hole?

A.

Great questions... and you're in luck. We just put up a great blog that describes everything you ever wanted to know about swarm traps. You can find it here. But briefly, to answer your questions, the hole (or holes) in a swarm trap should be no more than an inch. You can put multiple holes in a trap if you want to allow more bees to come in and out, but the idea is to make it so birds and small mice can't get into it. I myself would not go any larger than a half inch. As for a vent hole, yes, we recommend it. Put it near the top and put screen or hardware cloth over that one. Check out the blog as we list some great pictures with it and it'll help give you an idea.

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

The monthly general SIBA meeting that occurs the third Thursday of each month.
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Join us in October, when Jeffrey Maddox visits from the Ozarks in MO. He'll talk about how he grew his beekeeping business, 417Bees. Jeffrey sells 100 nucs a year, raises his own queens, and does professional removals/cut outs. He also sells honey, of course!

He'll talk about how his business developed and where he see's it going in the future. His goal is to help others understand some of the challenges faced in growing a business.

Find Jeffrey Maddox at:
Bees, Trees, Plants and Dance
317-698-8088
www.aFutureWithBees.com
Facebook: Argentine Tango Springfield, MO

Q?

SIBA General Meeting

A.

SIBA welcomes Alex Zomchek who will present "Monitoring 20." Thorough and timed monitoring for pests and diseases is critical in our high mortality age. Monitoring 2.0 incorporates a new perspective to examine what to look for; when to look; and what to do when confronted with hive problems.

Alex's beelab is located at the Ecology Research Center on Miami University’s campus. This was the home of L.L. Langstroth, the discoverer of the 3/8” bee space and inventor of the moveable frame beehive in the 1850s.

Contact Information
Alexander Zomchek
513.280.3476
[email protected]

Alex's Bio:
Lifelong Beekeeper (40+ yrs)
Apiculturist, Miami University (22 yrs)
Researcher, Instructor, Lecturer, Speaker
Master Beekeeper - Instructor, OSBA
Director w/ Ohio State Beekeepers Association
President, Butler County Beekeepers Association
Founder/Director, Apis Labs